COR 330 Class Descriptions

In the third year of the Core, students who are not studying abroad enroll in any two COR 330 courses. These two courses must be taken in the same semester. The 330 courses, which vary from semester to semester, offer a "deep dive" into various regions of the world and give students the opportunity to choose topics of interest to them.

Take a look at what is offered for the Spring 2017 semester:


COR 330-01 TBA

TBA – T/TH 2:30–3:45 PM

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COR 330-02: Dar al-Islam

Gary Scudder – T/F 8:00–9:15 AM
While Islam may be the fasting growing religion in the world, it is also the most routinely misunderstood faith. Similarly, the Islamic world is treated as being monolithic, when it is actually extraordinarily diverse. In this class, students will study the tenets of Islam but also explore the complexity of the Dar al-Islam. To facilitate this examination students will focus on Yemen, one of the world's oldest civilization but also a country being torn apart by divisions within the broader Islamic world.

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COR 330-03: Dar al-Islam

Gary Scudder – T/F 9:30–10:45 AM 

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COR 330-04: Shaking the Spirit

Steve Wehmeyer – M/TH 11:00 AM–12:15  PM 
Through an extensive examination of the material, ritual and performative arts associated with the cultures of Haiti, Cuba, Brazil and other Caribbean "hot-zones," students will explore the ways these arts embody and communicate sophisticated ideologies at the core of Caribbean cultural identities. Students will explore such diverse phenomena as the flamboyant costume arts and ritual dance-dramas of Haitian Rara, the elaborate altar assemblage and musical traditions associated with Cuban Santeria, and the transgressive sexual and gender performance of Pomba Gira's mediums in Brazil. In doing so, they will confront the fact that the Caribbean has been a locus of active globalization for over 500 years and learn that its visual, ritual and performative arts provide a record of the profound economic, religious, linguistic and cultural impact this region has had on the world at large.

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COR 330-05: Shaking the Spirit

Steve Wehmeyer – M 12:30 PM / W 9:30 AM

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COR 330-06TVL: Viva Libre! A Cuban Study and Travel Adventure

Rob Williams – M/TH 11:00 AM–12:15 PM 
Intended for adventurous student travelers, this course can be taken for either Core 330 or professional elective credit by 3rd and 4th year students in good academic standing. Our course will focus on modern Cuban history and culture, with an emphasis on exploring the Cuban/United States relationship since the rise of Fidel Castro, the coming of United States/Cuban "normalization," and the ways in which Cuban society, economics, politics and the arts reflects broader trends in modern Cuban history and culture. Our mandatory eight day spring break 2017 (March 10–March 19, 2017) travel trip with a licensed Cuban Travel Agency will immerse students in Cuban culture, folkways and traditions as well as exposing students to the current transformations Cuba is experiencing. The trip will cost approximately $2,750 plus airfare, and financial aid is available for eligible student travelers. Contact Dr. Rob Williams at rwilliams@champlain.edu for travel questions.

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COR 330-07: European Union: A House Divided

Ciaran Buckley – M 2:00 PM / W 11:00 AM
This course will investigate the emergence of global interdependence and interconnectedness and its influence on people, business and governments. Throughout, we will examine the experience made in the European Union where countries established institutions and coordinated policies to enable travel, cultural exchange and close cooperation under the motto "Unity in Diversity." We will analyze and understand also the challenges of unifying people from diverse European as well as non- European cultures. This course will raise the awareness of how people work closely and have begun establishing structures as well as international and cultural decision making processes to be able to deal effectively with the issues of increased interdependence and interconnectedness among diverse peoples and groups. We will look at the European Union in its current form, ascertain its needs to succeed and research the cultural, political and institutional responses in order to make interdependence structures visible.

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COR 330-08: Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors

Kerry Noonan – M 12:30 PM / W 9:30 AM 
Hungry ghosts, ancestor worship, the Kitchen God, Guanyin, Buddhism, Daoism, feng shui: All these are components of the folk religions of China. This course will examine the supernatural in China, looking at religions like Buddhism and Daoism as well as new religions such as Falung Gong. We will also consider supernatural beliefs, such as ghost tales, and ideas about the dead. How have these beliefs survived under half a century of official atheism? Now that religion is somewhat tolerated in China, what directions is it taking today?

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COR 330-09: Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors

Kerry Noonan – M 2:00 PM / W 11:00 AM

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COR 330-10: Life in the Amazon: Human and Ecological Communities of the Amazon River Basin

Kristin Wolf – M/TH 9:30-10:45  AM
The Amazon River Basin (ARB) is the most biodiverse place on Earth; it is also home to hundreds of human communities, making it a unique and appropriate setting to study the intersection of humanity and ecology. In this course we will explore, compare and contrast various lifeways of human communities of the Peruvian Amazon along a gradient of the contested concept of "development." With special interest topics in tropical forest ecology, beekeeping with stingless bees, ecotourism and community-driven development, this interdisciplinary course will explore how various communities perceive and interact with their respective environments, highlight the exceptional characteristics of the larger Amazon ecosystem, and investigate the effects of globalization, both past and present, on the landscape and peoples of the Amazon. 

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COR 330-11: Life in the Amazon: Human and Ecological Communities of the Amazon River Basin 

Kristin Wolf – M/TH 11:00 AM–12:15 PM


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COR 330-12: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne – M 2:00 PM / W 11:00  AM
Drawing on the legacies of intersecting, overlapping and dynamic cultures of the geographic region called Jordan, this course seeks to understand the meaning of citizenship both for ethnic and cultural groups within Jordan and for students engaging in the world. The course will do this by focusing through the lens of co-existing cultural groups to understand the complex fabric that is modern-day Jordan. By examining the historical migration as well as the cultural values represented through art and media, the course will help students to understand the complexities of citizenship. Jordan, with its complex and myriad cultures, serves as a microcosm of the world. As students come to understand how disparate cultures may not only co-exist but also interact, they will have the opportunity to examine their own intersections and roles as they negotiate global engagement.

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COR 330-13: Istanbul

David Kite – T/TH 12:30–1:45  PM 
This section of COR 330 will examine the city first known as Byzantium, later Constantinople and now Istanbul—a city that has always been at the crossroads of major world cultures. Few other cities have been so routinely destroyed, remade and elevated by such a wide array of peoples and empires. This course is an interdisciplinary tour of this city. Texts will include items such as the mosaics and domes of Hagia Sophia, Sinan's Suleymaniye Mosque, and the expansive street life of the modern city.

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COR 330-14: Istanbul

David Kite – T/TH 2:00–3:15  PM 

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COR 330-15: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne – M 12:30 PM / W 9:30 AM

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COR 330-16: Irish Women and Drama: Identity and the Challenges of Globalization

Joanne Farrell – W/F 12:30–1:45 PM
The 20th century was an era of political upheaval, revolution, civil war and heated debate over what it means to be Irish. It was also a period of exceptional literary production and innovation, especially in theatre. Examining the ideological, historical and cultural issues in relation to the performance of woman, gender, sexuality and the body, on the Irish stage, in plays by and about women will allow us to understand the struggle for independence, identity and the challenges of globalization.

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COR 330-17: Irish Women and Drama: Identity and the Challenges of Globalization

Joanne Farrell – W/F 2:00–3:15 PM

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COR 330-18: TBA 

TBA – T/TH 2:00–3:15 PM

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COR 330-19: European Union: A House Divided

Ciaran Buckley – M 12:30 PM / W 9:30 AM 

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