COR 330 Class Descriptions

In the third year of the Core, students who are not studying abroad enroll in any two COR 330 courses. These two courses must be taken in the same semester. The 330 courses, which vary from semester to semester, offer a "deep dive" into various regions of the world and give students the opportunity to choose topics of interest to them.

Take a look at what is offered for the Fall 2015 Semester:


COR 330-01: Pakistan

Faculty Member TBA— T/TH 12:30-1:45 pm

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COR 330-02: Pakistan

Faculty Member TBA — T/TH 3:30-4:45 pm

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COR 330-03: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne—T/TH 2:00-3:15 pm

Drawing on the legacies of intersecting, overlapping, and dynamic cultures of the geographic region called Jordan, this course seeks to understand the meaning of citizenship both for ethnic and cultural groups within Jordan and for students engaging in the world. The course will do this by focusing through the lens of co-existing cultural groups to understand the complex fabric that is modern-day Jordan. By examining the historical migration as well as the cultural values represented through art and media, the course will help students to understand the complexities of citizenship. Jordan, with its complex and myriad cultures, serves as a microcosm of the world. As students come to understand how disparate cultures may not only co-exist but also interact, they will have the opportunity to examine their own intersections and roles as they negotiate global engagement.

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COR 330-04: Shaking the Spirit: Sacred Arts of the Afro-Atlantic World

Steve Wehmeyer— W/F 12:30-1:45 pm

Through an extensive examination of the material, ritual, and performative arts associated with the cultures of Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, and other Caribbean "hot-zones," students will explore the ways these arts embody and communicate sophisticated ideologies at the core of Caribbean cultural identities. Students will explore such diverse phenomena as the flamboyant costume arts and ritual dance-dramas of Haitian Rara, the elaborate altar assemblage and musical traditions associated with Cuban Santeria, and the transgressive sexual and gender performance of Pomba Gira's mediums in Brazil. In doing so they will confront the fact that the Caribbean has been a locus of active globalization for over 500 years, and that its visual, ritual, and performative arts provide a record of the profound economic, religious, linguistic, and cultural impact this region has had on the world at large.

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COR 330-05: Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors

Kerry Noonan—T/TH 12:30-1:45 pm

Hungry ghosts, ancestor worship, the Kitchen God, Guanyin, Buddhism, Daoism, feng shui: all these are components of the folk religions of China. This course will examine the supernatural in China, looking at religions like Buddhism and Daoism as well as new religions such as Falung Gong. We will also consider supernatural beliefs, such as ghost tales, and ideas about the dead. How have these beliefs survived under half a century of official atheism? Now that religion is somewhat tolerated in China, what directions is it taking today?

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COR 330-06: Shaking the Spirit: Sacred Arts of the Afro-Atlantic World

Steve Wehmeyer— W/F 2:00-3:15 pm

Through an extensive examination of the material, ritual, and performative arts associated with the cultures of Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, and other Caribbean "hot-zones," students will explore the ways these arts embody and communicate sophisticated ideologies at the core of Caribbean cultural identities. Students will explore such diverse phenomena as the flamboyant costume arts and ritual dance-dramas of Haitian Rara, the elaborate altar assemblage and musical traditions associated with Cuban Santeria, and the transgressive sexual and gender performance of Pomba Gira's mediums in Brazil. In doing so they will confront the fact that the Caribbean has been a locus of active globalization for over 500 years, and that its visual, ritual, and performative arts provide a record of the profound economic, religious, linguistic, and cultural impact this region has had on the world at large.

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COR 330-07: Arab Spring: Social Media and Social Movements in the Modern Middle East

Rob Williams — M/TH 11:00-12:15pm

Our course will explore the arrival of "pro-democracy" movements in the modern Middle East. From Tunisia to Egypt to Yemen and beyond, ordinary Arabs are challenging traditional power centers in a quest to create a more democratic and inclusive society. We will explore the causes of the Arab Spring, and ways in which the Arab Spring have transformed the Arab World since 2011.

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COR 330-08: Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors

Kerry Noonan— T/TH 2:00-3:15 pm

Hungry ghosts, ancestor worship, the Kitchen God, Guanyin, Buddhism, Daoism, feng shui: all these are components of the folk religions of China. This course will examine the supernatural in China, looking at religions like Buddhism and Daoism as well as new religions such as Falung Gong. We will also consider supernatural beliefs, such as ghost tales, and ideas about the dead. How have these beliefs survived under half a century of official atheism? Now that religion is somewhat tolerated in China, what directions is it taking today?

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COR 330-09: Arab Spring: Social Media and Social Movements in the Modern Middle East

Rob Williams —M/TH 9:30-10:45 am

Our course will explore the arrival of "pro-democracy" movements in the modern Middle East. From Tunisia to Egypt to Yemen and beyond, ordinary Arabs are challenging traditional power centers in a quest to create a more democratic and inclusive society. We will explore the causes of the Arab Spring, and ways in which the Arab Spring have transformed the Arab World since 2011.

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COR 330-10: Vienna and the Austro-Hungarian Empire: Border and Bridge Between West and East

Betsy Allen-Pennebaker—M 2:00-3:15 pm / W 11:00-12:15 pm

From its earliest days as a Roman garrison settlement, the city of Vienna has long been the "final outpost" on the cultural and geopolitical border between the West and the East, as well as a bridge between the two. As the seat of royal, imperial, and national governments, and the site of epic battles and nuclear-age standoffs, Vienna offers an unparalleled opportunity to explore the complex and fraught relationship between West and East. Once the capital of the ethnically-diverse Austro-Hungarian Empire, which for a time united West and East under a single crown, Vienna was, and still is, a rich mix of cultures and nationalities with a complicated and often painful relationship with its own multicultural identity.

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COR 330-11: Box Office Borderlines: The Politics of Post-Revolutionary Film

Erik Esckilsen— T/F 9:30-10:45 am

Students in this course examine the film cultures of several countries (re)defined by revolution in the 20th century, with an emphasis on the People's Republic of China. Coursework will focus on such topics as government influence - negative and positive - on film production; popular cinema's role in cultivating national identity; independent cinema as critical commentary; and digital media as an agent of trans-national audience development. While this course delves deeply into Chinese cinema, students also explore how film and other expressive arts are shaped by - and shape - political dynamics in the Islamic Republic of Iran, the former Soviet Union, and other post-revolutionary national contexts.

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COR 330-51: Vienna and the Austro-Hungarian Empire: Border and Bridge Between West and East

Betsy Allen-Pennebaker—M/W 5:00-6:15 pm

From its earliest days as a Roman garrison settlement, the city of Vienna has long been the "final outpost" on the cultural and geopolitical border between the West and the East, as well as a bridge between the two. As the seat of royal, imperial, and national governments, and the site of epic battles and nuclear-age standoffs, Vienna offers an unparalleled opportunity to explore the complex and fraught relationship between West and East. Once the capital of the ethnically-diverse Austro-Hungarian Empire, which for a time united West and East under a single crown, Vienna was, and still is, a rich mix of cultures and nationalities with a complicated and often painful relationship with its own multicultural identity.

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COR 330-52: Drawing Across Cultures: Creating a Visual Language Between America and Jordan

Valerie Hird— W 5:30-8:15 pm

A hands-on, interdisciplinary course that draws from anthropology, creative writing, semiotics, performance, and graphic arts and challenges us to 'unpack' the visual signals we give and receive everyday. The course will expand our knowledge of our own American cultural identity to include the diverse voices and perspectives of Jordan, from the ancient Nabataean culture and Haji paintings to contemporary artists such as Mazen Kerbaj, Marjane Satrapi, and Malik Sajad along with interviews with Jordanian/Palestinian/Americans. From these sources and more, we create a hybrid, image-based language for the purpose of sharing stories across cultures. Finally, we will be testing how far we can stretch the interpretation of these visual translations by sharing them through digital media with a broader audience.

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