COR 330 Class Descriptions

In the third year of the Core, students who are not studying abroad enroll in any two COR 330 courses. These two courses must be taken in the same semester. The 330 courses, which vary from semester to semester, offer a "deep dive" into various regions of the world and give students the opportunity to choose topics of interest to them.

Take a look at what is offered for the Fall 2017 semester:


COR 330-01: Pakistan

Faculty Member TBA – W/F 2:00–3:15 PM

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COR 330-02: Shaking the Spirit: Sacred Arts of the Afro Caribbean World

Steve Wehmeyer – W/F 2:00–3:15 PM
Through an extensive examination of the material, ritual, and performative arts associated with the cultures of Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, and other Caribbean "hot-zones," students will explore the ways these arts embody and communicate sophisticated ideologies at the core of Caribbean cultural identities. Students will explore such diverse phenomena as the flamboyant costume arts and ritual dance-dramas of Haitian Rara, the elaborate altar assemblage and musical traditions associated with Cuban Santeria, and the transgressive sexual and gender performance of Pomba Gira's mediums in Brazil.  In doing so they will confront the fact that the Caribbean has been a locus of active globalization for over 500 years, and that its visual, ritual, and performative arts provide a record of the profound economic, religious, linguistic, and cultural impact this region has had on the world at large.

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COR 330-03: Dar al-Islam

Gary Scudder – M/TH 9:30–10:45 AM 

While Islam may be the fasting growing religion in the world, it is also the most routinely misunderstood faith. Similarly, the Islamic world is treated as being monolithic, when it is actually extraordinarily diverse. In this class students will study the tenets of Islam but also explore the complexity of the Dar al-Islam. To facilitate this examination students will focus on Yemen, one of the world's oldest civilization but also a country being torn apart by divisions within the broader Islamic world.

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COR 330-04: Arab Spring: Social Media and Social Movements in the Modern Middle East

Rob Williams – M/TH 8:00 AM–9:15  AM 
Our course will explore the arrival of "pro-democracy" movements in the modern Middle East.  From Tunisia to Egypt to Yemen and beyond, ordinary Arabs are challenging traditional power centers in a quest to create a more democratic and inclusive society.  We will explore the causes of the Arab Spring, and ways in which the Arab Spring have transformed the Arab World since 2011.

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COR 330-05: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne – T/TH 12:30–1:45 PM

Drawing on the legacies of intersecting, overlapping, and dynamic cultures of the geographic region called Jordan, this course seeks to understand the meaning of citizenship both for ethnic and cultural groups within Jordan and for students engaging in the world.  The course will do this by focusing through the lens of co-existing cultural groups to understand the complex fabric that is modern-day Jordan.  By examining the historical migration as well as the cultural values represented through art and media, the course will help students to understand the complexities of citizenship. Jordan, with its complex and myriad cultures, serves as a microcosm of the world.  As students come to understand how disparate cultures may not only co-exist but also interact, they will have the opportunity to examine their own intersections and roles as they negotiate global engagement.

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COR 330-06: Pakistan

Faculty Member TBA – W/F 3:30–4:45 PM

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COR 330-07: Shaking the Spirit: Sacred Arts of the Afro Caribbean World

Steve Wehmeyer – W/F 12:30–1:45 PM
Through an extensive examination of the material, ritual, and performative arts associated with the cultures of Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, and other Caribbean "hot-zones," students will explore the ways these arts embody and communicate sophisticated ideologies at the core of Caribbean cultural identities. Students will explore such diverse phenomena as the flamboyant costume arts and ritual dance-dramas of Haitian Rara, the elaborate altar assemblage and musical traditions associated with Cuban Santeria, and the transgressive sexual and gender performance of Pomba Gira's mediums in Brazil. In doing so they will confront the fact that the Caribbean has been a locus of active globalization for over 500 years, and that its visual, ritual, and performative arts provide a record of the profound economic, religious, linguistic, and cultural impact this region has had on the world at large.

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COR 330-08: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne – T/TH 2:00–3:15 PM 
Drawing on the legacies of intersecting, overlapping, and dynamic cultures of the geographic region called Jordan, this course seeks to understand the meaning of citizenship both for ethnic and cultural groups within Jordan and for students engaging in the world.  The course will do this by focusing through the lens of co-existing cultural groups to understand the complex fabric that is modern-day Jordan.  By examining the historical migration as well as the cultural values represented through art and media, the course will help students to understand the complexities of citizenship.   Jordan, with its complex and myriad cultures, serves as a microcosm of the world.  As students come to understand how disparate cultures may not only co-exist but also interact, they will have the opportunity to examine their own intersections and roles as they negotiate global engagement.

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