FAQs

Q: Who Is Eligible?
A:  Accommodation Services are available to all currently enrolled students who have a documented disability that substantially limits them in one or more of life's major activities. Individuals eligible for services include, but are not limited to students with mobility, orthopedic, hearing, visual, speech, and learning challenges.

Q: What documentation is needed?
A: In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids, Champlain's Counseling Center and Accommodation Services Office will need documentation of the condition that consists of an evaluation by an appropriate professional that describes the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested.
Once Champlain's review is complete, the Coordinator will contact the student to inform him/her of any accommodations for which s/he was approved, and what must be done to implement those accommodations. If accommodations are denied, the Coordinator will explain why and what can be done to support those interests.

Q: Did you have an IEP or 504 Plan in high school?
A: For individuals who have recently been receiving services from a public school system, the information requested would most likely be contained in the Psycho-Educational Evaluation report from your most recent Triennial Review. Some of the information may also be contained in an IEP, 504 Plan, or Transition Plan. You may wish to include this with your Psycho-Educational Evaluation report as supportive documentation. You must request this information separately from your high school transcripts and should make sure that it is received by the Counseling Center. It is very important to understand that IEPs and 504 Plans do not suffice as adequate documentation to accompany a student to a college since both are required under laws that do not apply once the student attends college.

Q: Are you transferring from another college or university?
A: For individuals transferring from another college or university, information related to your disability will not be sent with a transcript request. You must request that information be sent to Champlain's Counseling Center and Accommodation Services Office separately. Additionally, the information Champlain is requesting may or may not have been a part of your previous college's evaluation process. If you have any questions, please contact the Counseling Center and Accommodation Services Office at 802-865-5484 or 802-651-5961.

Q: Confidentiality Statement?
A: All contact information and documentation received by the Counseling Center is kept in separate confidential files within the office. No information concerning inquiries about accommodations or documentation will be released without consent by the student.

Q: What kinds of accommodations are typically provided?
A: Services may include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Accessible classrooms
  2. Course aids (such as extended time for exams, recorders, note takers and text in alternate format)
  3. On-campus housing accommodations

Q: How do I register for services & Request Accommodations?
A: Eligibility must first be determined in order to make arrangements for using services and receive accommodations from the Counseling Center and Accommodation Services Office. It is the student's responsibility to provide current documentation to the Counseling Center.

INCOMING FRESHMEN:

Contact the Counseling Center and Accommodation Services Office after acceptance to Champlain College in order to determine what documentation is necessary to determine eligibility for services.

  • Register for services
  • Identify special needs
  • Discuss the impact of the condition on course selection and scheduling
  • Create a plan for the upcoming semester

Once Champlain's review is complete, the Coordinator will contact the student to inform him/her of any accommodations for which s/he was approved, and what must be done to implement those accommodations.  If accommodations are denied, the Coordinator will explain why and what can be done to support those interests.

CURRENT STUDENTS:

Please contact the Counseling Center prior to, or as early in the semester as possible and provide appropriate documentation of your disability. After appropriate documentation is received, student information will be gathered and eligibility will be discussed. The Coordinator will then determine, with the student's input, what services and accommodations are needed for each course.

Preferably well before the start of each semester, students must work with the Accommodations Coordinator to review their course schedule, determine which accommodations will be requested of instructors and obtain notices for them which contain specific accommodations or raises awareness in regard to a condition which may require special consideration.

The student is responsible for promptly providing the notices to their instructors and may not receive accommodations until that communication occurs.  Students must obtain faculty notices each term of enrollment and provide them at beginning of the semester in order to receive accommodations.  Instructors are not obligated to provide any accommodations which are not presented in the notice to faculty.

Q: How do College and High School differ?
A: It is very important to understand that IEPs and 504 Plans do not suffice as adequate documentation to accompany a student to a college since both are required under laws that do not apply once the student attends college. Although college students are covered under Section 504, they are covered under Subpart E, a different section of the law.

The key point to remember is that the purpose of the IDEA is to ensure that students are successful in the K-12 system whereas the ADA and Section 504 only ensure access, because success in college is up to the student!

Overall, the responsibilities of the student and of the school are very different at the post-secondary level. Here are some key points:

Identification

  • At the high school level, the school is responsible for identifying students with conditions or special needs, testing those students, and providing services.
  • At the college level, the student must locate the office that provides services for students with disabilities (the Counseling Center in Champlain's case), identify him- or herself to the office, request accommodations, and provide documentation to support the need for accommodations. Any student who needs additional or updated information to support accommodation requests, or who has never been identified before college, is responsible for paying for any testing.

Services

  • At the high school level, students are typically assigned time to attend the resource room where strategy instruction is taught with a teacher who is specifically trained in working with students with disabilities.
  • In college, unless the student chooses a school with a specialized program that provides such services, the student must make his/her own appointments at a learning center (Champlain has several learning labs) , where services are generally the same for all students (i.e. no special kind of instruction is typically offered for students with learning challenges) and the staff does not typically have special training or background in working with students with learning challenges or special needs.

Communication

  • At the high school level, part of a student's plan may include mandated follow-up by school staff to inform parents of the student's academic performance, completion of homework, etc.
  • A college may not, by law, contact parents about a student's academic performance unless the student gives the college permission to do so. Champlain encourages parents wishing to know how their student is doing to ask the student directly and highly discourages communication with faculty and staff that excludes the student.
  • At the high school level, a formal plan (IEP or 504 plan) makes it the school's responsibility to arrange for the student to receive accommodations.
  • At the post-secondary level, the student must, once approved, request his or her accommodations in each instance that they are needed. For example, the student must provide a purchased copy of a text in order to have it converted to an alternative format. For testing accommodations, the student must provide the appropriate office with the dates and times of his or her exams and may be required to have more participation in the arrangements for such accommodations. Colleges are not responsible for knowing a student's schedule and arranging accommodations without some form of initiation from the student.

Objective of Accommodations

  • In high school, accommodations and services are usually designed to maximize a student's potential.
  • In college, accommodations are granted to create a "level playing field," rather than to help a student reach his or her greatest potential. Often, the reason certain accommodation requests are rejected is that they go beyond the scope of this goal.

It is important to understand that services vary from college to college. Students transferring from one post-secondary institution to another may experience differences in the level of service offered. Any student with questions should contact Champlain's Counseling Center.

(The above information provided courtesy of the Office of Disabilities Services at Rutgers University.)


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