Scientific Revolutions

Original Version

The challenges of the 21st century demand an understanding of the nature and limitations of scientific thinking, the place of science within society, and its relationship to other forms of human thought and expression such as religion, art, and literature. This course will examine three major transformations of scientific ideas and their social and historical context, and will help students gain a broad understanding of the relationship of scientific ideas to other forms of thought and expression.


COR 210-01: Scientific Revolutions: X-Files Edition

Chuck Bashaw | T, F 8:00 AM

This section will focus partly on ideas and phenomena on the "fringe" of science, including UFOs, magic and the occult, and the paranormal and the supernatural. This section of COR-210 is cohorted with a section of COR-250 in Spring 2018, taught by Steve Wehmeyer. Students who enroll in this section of 210 must also commit to enrolling in Wehmeyer's section of 250-02 in Spring 2018. Enrollment in each section is by instructor permission only.

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COR 210-02: Scientific Revolutions: The Resistance

Cyndi Brandenburg | T, F 8:00 AM

In the past, scientific knowledge was simultaneously resisted and embraced, and our complex cultural relationship with science persists to the modern day. By exploring contemporary anxieties and fears revolving around scientific advancements, students will be better able to understand and appreciate the implications of past scientific revolutions as well as the reasons why current scientific knowledge is so often met with resistance.

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COR 210-03SIS: Scientific Revolutions: The Resistance

Cyndi Brandenburg | T, F 9:30 AM

In the past, scientific knowledge was simultaneously resisted and embraced, and our complex cultural relationship with science persists to the modern day. By exploring contemporary anxieties and fears revolving around scientific advancements, students will be better able to understand and appreciate the implications of past scientific revolutions as well as the reasons why current scientific knowledge is so often met with resistance.  

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COR 210-04: Scientific Revolutions: Original Version

David Leo-Nyquist | T, Th 3:30 PM

The challenges of the 21st century demand an understanding of the nature and limitations of scientific thinking, the place of science within society, and its relationship to other forms of human thought and expression such as religion, art, and literature. This course will examine three major transformations of scientific ideas and their social and historical context, and will help students gain a broad understanding of the relationship of scientific ideas to other forms of thought and expression.

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COR 210-05: Scientific Revolutions: Trial of Galileo

Craig Pepin | M 2:00 PM, W 11:00 AM

In this section, we will dedicate part of the semester to exploring the birth of modern conceptions of science in the 17th century through a historical reenactment/role-playing game centered on the Trial of Galileo. Over the course of five weeks, you will take on a role in 17th century Rome and jockey for power, debate with opponents, scheme with like-minded players, uncover heretics, and possibly even be elected Pope.

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COR 210-06: Scientific Revolutions: Citizen Science

Kristin Wolf | M, Th 9:30 AM

In this section, students will explore the concept of scientific literacy and its role in being a responsible citizen. Investigating the science of vaccines, GMOs, climate change, and other popular topics, students will see how science is communicated, applied, and, in some cases, misunderstood by the time it reaches the general public.  

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COR 210-07: Scientific Revolutions: Citizen Science

Kristin Wolf | M, Th 11:00 AM

In this section, students will explore the concept of scientific literacy and its role in being a responsible citizen. Investigating the science of vaccines, GMOs, climate change, and other popular topics, students will see how science is communicated, applied, and, in some cases, misunderstood by the time it reaches the general public.

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COR 210-51: Scientific Revolutions: Original Version

David Leo-Nyquist | T, Th 5:00 PM

The challenges of the 21st century demand an understanding of the nature and limitations of scientific thinking, the place of science within society, and its relationship to other forms of human thought and expression such as religion, art, and literature. This course will examine three major transformations of scientific ideas and their social and historical context, and will help students gain a broad understanding of the relationship of scientific ideas to other forms of thought and expression.

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