COR 330 Class Descriptions

In the third year of the Core, students who are not studying abroad enroll in any two COR 330 courses. These two courses must be taken in the same semester. The 330 courses, which vary from semester to semester, offer a "deep dive" into various regions of the world and give students the opportunity to choose topics of interest to them.

Take a look at what is offered for the Fall 2019 semester:


COR 330-01: In Love and At War

Veruska Cantelli | M 8:00–10:45 AM

This course is an exploration on the understanding of "passion" from a historical and philosophical point of view and as a foundation to explore ethical questions in the face of conflict and political upheaval. Historically in the West, passion has been defined as a combination of pain and pleasure or as the desire to live, or to self-preserve; an aesthetic consideration of taste, or the attainment of virtue and glory. Passions have been valued as dangerous and in need to be controlled, but have also been at the forefront of radical political shifts. Passion in the context of conflict demands our return to its correspondence with ethics, as an appeal to humanity. How can love, for instance, be a means of self-determination, a way out of victimhood, and a mode of social change and political action? Our journey will examine love as a trope and a reality in the context of conflict outside of western paradigms through a variety of theories, visual art representations, and films. The course is designed to focus on comparative methodologies as key to deepen and broaden our understanding of cultural representations of passions in the face of conflict.

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COR 330-02TVL: In Love and At War

Veruska Cantelli | M 12:30–3:15 PM

This course is an exploration on the understanding of "passion" from a historical and philosophical point of view and as a foundation to explore ethical questions in the face of conflict and political upheaval. Historically in the West, passion has been defined as a combination of pain and pleasure or as the desire to live, or to self-preserve; an aesthetic consideration of taste, or the attainment of virtue and glory. Passions have been valued as dangerous and in need to be controlled, but have also been at the forefront of radical political shifts. Passion in the context of conflict demands our return to its correspondence with ethics, as an appeal to humanity. How can love, for instance, be a means of self-determination, a way out of victimhood, and a mode of social change and political action? Our journey will examine love as a trope and a reality in the context of conflict outside of western paradigms through a variety of theories, visual art representations, and films. The course is designed to focus on comparative methodologies as key to deepen and broaden our understanding of cultural representations of passions in the face of conflict.

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COR 330-03: Irish Women and Drama: Identity and the Challenges of Globalization

Joanne Farrell | T, Th 3:30–4:45 PM

The 20th century was an era of political upheaval, revolution, civil war, and heated debate over what it means to be Irish. It was also a period of exceptional literary production and innovation, especially in theatre. Examining the ideological, historical, and cultural issues in relation to the performance of woman, gender, sexuality, and the body on the Irish stage in plays by and about women will allow us to understand the struggle for independence, identity, and the challenges of globalization.

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COR 330-04: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne | Th 3:30–6:15 PM

Drawing on the legacies of intersecting, overlapping, and dynamic cultures of the geographic region called Jordan, this course seeks to understand the meaning of citizenship both for ethnic and cultural groups within Jordan and for students engaging in the world. The course will do this by focusing through the lens of co-existing cultural groups to understand the complex fabric that is modern-day Jordan. By examining the historical migration as well as the cultural values represented through art and media, the course will help students understand the complexities of citizenship. Jordan, with its complex and myriad cultures, serves as a microcosm of the world. As students come to understand how disparate cultures may not only co-exist but also interact, they will have the opportunity to examine their own intersections and roles as they negotiate global engagement.

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COR 330-05: Identity in Jordan's Cultural Mosaic

Miriam Horne | T 3:30–6:15 PM

This section will investigate the emergence of global interdependence and interconnectedness and its influence on people, business and governments. Throughout we will examine the experience made in the European Union where countries established institutions and coordinated policies to enable travel, cultural exchange and close cooperation under the motto 'Unity in Diversity." We will analyze and understand also the challenges of unifying people from diverse European as well as non- European cultures. 

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COR 330-06: Buddhism in Tibet

David Kite | M, Th 9:30–10:45 AM

Buddhism moved from its origins in ancient northern India throughout the Far East and China and into one of its most distinctive modern forms in Tibet. This course will look at Buddhist ideas, texts, and practices to see how they came to form a basis of Tibetan culture and a principal source of identity in the contested relationship between modern China and Tibet today.

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COR 330-07: Buddhism in Tibet

David Kite | M 12:30–1:45 PM, W 9:30—10:45 AM

Buddhism moved from its origins in ancient northern India throughout the Far East and China and into one of its most distinctive modern forms in Tibet. This course will look at Buddhist ideas, texts, and practices to see how they came to form a basis of Tibetan culture and a principal source of identity in the contested relationship between modern China and Tibet today.

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