Professional Development and Coaching Workbook

Professional Develop and Coaching Workbook

At Champlain College, we place value on the opportunity for staff and managers to have meaningful conversations throughout the year to discuss goals, accomplishments, challenges, and professional development. In order to focus on developing talents through continuous conversation, we are moving away from an annual performance evaluation process and moving towards a continuous performance management model using coaching as a framework for the conversations. Conversations can be initiated by either staff members or managers.

About the workbook:
The Professional Development & Coaching Workbook is a resource to guide you through coaching conversations. In the workbook, you will learn more about the GROW model of coaching, find suggested frequency and structure of coaching sessions, and find sample generative questions. You can use the sample questions during the coaching session to help your coachee reflect and find their way forward. You will also find templates that can be used to prepare for and document your conversations. These templates are meant to be a guide, as it is ultimately up to each employee and their manager how they would like to structure these coaching conversations.

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Coaching Resources

For additional resources or coaching support, please reach out to Howie LeBlanco, leblanco@champlain.edu.

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Yes. We learned that the annual performance review process with a rating scale, long write-ups, and once a year conversation was not effective in developing and inspiring growth at Champlain. This Professional Development and Coaching Workbook is a prototype, using ideas brought forth from our research into ways to engage, motivate, and develop employees. Coaching and continuous conversations are the foundations of the proposed process. It is our goal to collect feedback throughout the Summer and Fall from users of the workbook to refine the process, which will eventually be automated and live in Oracle's Human Capital Management system.

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Coaching is a collaborative dialogue between individuals. Coaching is believing people already have what they need to solve their own problems. Coaches in this engagement have the responsibility to help unlock their coachees' potential and help them generate their own solutions and ideas by staying curious and asking generative questions. In a successful coaching engagement, the coachee does all the talking and reflecting, while the coach engages only by asking questions to push the coachee to dig deeper and think more expansively.

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Both. The process was intentionally designed to empower staff to seek and ask for the development and coaching they need to accomplish their goals or projects. Staff members are encouraged to set up meetings with their managers. Managers may find this process a helpful tool to initiate new projects or goals for members of their team in a way that sets everyone up for success.

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Coaching sessions can range in length; they can be short or long. The length depends on the topic of discussion and the level of engagement from both parties. We recommend that to start, you should strive for at least 30 minutes.

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Center your coaching session around a goal. Are you currently working on a project that could benefit from coaching? Do you have a professional development goal you are not sure how to achieve or start? Focus on one topic per session.

Tip: It is appropriate to ask or be asked what the desired outcome or goal of the session is in order to help the Coach frame their questions.

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Save or print the workbook and reflection sheets. The workbook is designed to offer flexibility. You and your coachee can decide who takes notes (perhaps both) and whether notes are taken electronically or on paper.

Tip: Using a computer can be distracting during coaching sessions, but coaching is about customization. Ask your coachee how they would like to document the conversation.

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Coaching can help individuals increase self-reliance, gain job satisfaction, establish and take actions towards goals, and take more responsibility and accountability for their growth and development. In addition, it can build or strengthen trust between individuals.

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Coaching sessions are centered around one topic. Coaching is intentional and focuses on the employee's growth and development. Unlike one-on-ones, during a coaching session, the coach focuses only on asking questions to help coachees think expansively and creatively when generating their own solutions to their problems or goals.

Tip: Coaching should happen regularly, but not necessarily weekly, unless needed and desired.

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Successful coaching sessions end with a commitment from the coachee to take action. Before concluding the session, review the ideas, solutions, and perspectives generated during the session. The coachee should commit to putting something into action immediately to move closer to attaining the goal or solving the problem.

Tip: It is reasonable to ask or be asked, "What can you commit to doing immediately after this session?" and "How can I best support you to move forward with [action item]?"

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No. You might end your session with a goal instead of a solution. Schedule a follow-up session to help move the goal forward if that's the case. There may also be times when you need to pause the conversation to allow independent thinking and reflection, such as when the scope of the project is too big or the goal is not yet clear and defined.

Tip: For a big project, consider breaking it into manageable tasks and give each task their dedicated session. Not sure what the goal is? Use the coaching session to generate a list of potential goals and commit to the ones that are SMART, CLEAR, or FAST.

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