First-Year Experience

Students in Core Year 1 Classroom

In your first year at Champlain, you will focus on being a student. What is your role, both here on campus and in a historical sense? Where can you find support? How do you write a college-level paper, anyway?

Our Navigating classes equip all students with the agency and resources to succeed in the collegiate environment. You'll take one Navigating course in the fall and one in the spring.

The First Year Inquiry (FYI) classes focus on experiential learning and sparking your curiosity and academic passion. Each FYI course offers a variety of sections, meaning you can take the FYI courses (one in the fall and one in the spring) that look most interesting to you. Enrolled first-year students will be contacted with more information about course registration.

Fall Semester

COR 101 | Navigating Higher Education

Why go to college? What does it mean to be educated? In this course, you'll begin to answer these questions. We'll explore the academic expectations of higher education, college as a diverse community, and the significance of education around the world. By examining how these issues are negotiated and implemented at Champlain and elsewhere, you'll gain perspective on your own education and a deeper understanding of the ways that the college experience can be both liberating and transformative.

COR 102 | First Year Inquiry (FYI): Reading, Writing, and ____

Inquiry is about learning how to ask the right kinds of questions, and figuring out how to answer those questions through discussion and reflection. This course introduces you to the types of inquiry necessary to succeed at Champlain and beyond. You will explore the intersections of reading, writing, and thinking by focusing on a specific topic or theme. You will approach that focus through the interrogation of relevant texts and analysis that draws upon multiple analytical frameworks.

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Alfonso Capone

Have you ever wondered who Karl Max is or what he wrote? Have you ever wondered why so many admire or revile him? Have you ever wondered what it means to be a Marxist? In this section we will examine Marx's writings using the lenses of philosophy, literature, and economics, and you will answer all these questions for yourself.

Link to this FAQ

Christine Brooks

Being outside in the beauty of late summer Vermont and into the fall season offers us time to revive our spirits. Burlington, Vermont offers many tucked away and obvious nature escapes, and the city itself is in full bloom when fall semester begins. We will spend one day each week in the classroom learning about our natural world and one day a week walking and exploring. Reading selections from Tristen Gooley's, The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs will influence our observance of grass, plants, lichens, trees, the sky, and the lake. We will look at wind, rain, clouds, and colors of the rainbow. Discussions will be held to observe patterns and continual changes. As the semester moves on and temperatures begin to fall, we will read and respond to a variety of texts using the knowledge we gained in the beginning of the semester. We will critically think and analyze how to be prepared and safe in nature, what it means to protect our natural environment, and make connections with stories from cultures that may differ from our own. We will engage in Critical Thinking and Analysis using a Literary, Scientific, and Psychological framework. There will be an extra credit walk when the snow begins to fall. Getting out in all weather is healthy for our souls.

Link to this FAQ

Christine Brooks

Being outside in the beauty of late summer Vermont and into the fall season offers us time to revive our spirits. Burlington, Vermont offers many tucked away and obvious nature escapes, and the city itself is in full bloom when fall semester begins. We will spend one day each week in the classroom learning about our natural world and one day a week walking and exploring. Reading selections from Tristen Gooley's, The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs will influence our observance of grass, plants, lichens, trees, the sky, and the lake. We will look at wind, rain, clouds, and colors of the rainbow. Discussions will be held to observe patterns and continual changes. As the semester moves on and temperatures begin to fall, we will read and respond to a variety of texts using the knowledge we gained in the beginning of the semester. We will critically think and analyze how to be prepared and safe in nature, what it means to protect our natural environment, and make connections with stories from cultures that may differ from our own. We will engage in Critical Thinking and Analysis using a Literary, Scientific, and Psychological framework. There will be an extra credit walk when the snow begins to fall. Getting out in all weather is healthy for our souls.

Link to this FAQ

Christine Brooks

Being outside in the beauty of late summer Vermont and into the fall season offers us time to revive our spirits. Burlington, Vermont offers many tucked away and obvious nature escapes, and the city itself is in full bloom when fall semester begins. We will spend one day each week in the classroom learning about our natural world and one day a week walking and exploring. Reading selections from Tristen Gooley's, The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs will influence our observance of grass, plants, lichens, trees, the sky, and the lake. We will look at wind, rain, clouds, and colors of the rainbow. Discussions will be held to observe patterns and continual changes. As the semester moves on and temperatures begin to fall, we will read and respond to a variety of texts using the knowledge we gained in the beginning of the semester. We will critically think and analyze how to be prepared and safe in nature, what it means to protect our natural environment, and make connections with stories from cultures that may differ from our own. We will engage in Critical Thinking and Analysis using a Literary, Scientific, and Psychological framework. There will be an extra credit walk when the snow begins to fall. Getting out in all weather is healthy for our souls.

Link to this FAQ

Jeff Haig

From the American Revolution to Rage Against the Machine, from the Civil War to Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter, popular music has been a powerful tool for amplifying the voices and stories of protest. This course will explore the ways in which songs have been used to communicate and inspire social action and give voice to the voiceless throughout history. We will explore the ways in which such artists as Joe Hill, Bessie Smith, Bob Dylan, Green Day and Kendrick Lamar have redefined the genre, and energized new audiences to reject old stereotypes. By the end of the course, you will have developed a deeper appreciation and understanding of the power of music to raise awareness, express dissent, and mobilize people to action.

Link to this FAQ

Jeff Haig

From the American Revolution to Rage Against the Machine, from the Civil War to Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter, popular music has been a powerful tool for amplifying the voices and stories of protest. This course will explore the ways in which songs have been used to communicate and inspire social action and give voice to the voiceless throughout history. We will explore the ways in which such artists as Joe Hill, Bessie Smith, Bob Dylan, Green Day and Kendrick Lamar have redefined the genre, and energized new audiences to reject old stereotypes. By the end of the course, you will have developed a deeper appreciation and understanding of the power of music to raise awareness, express dissent, and mobilize people to action.

Link to this FAQ

Alfonso Capone

Have you ever wondered who Karl Max is or what he wrote? Have you ever wondered why so many admire or revile him? Have you ever wondered what it means to be a Marxist? In this section we will examine Marx's writings using the lenses of philosophy, literature, and economics, and you will answer all these questions for yourself.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Kaarla

This section will tap into the human passion of wanting to understand music, wanting to make music, and wanting to define music better. Whether you play an instrument or not—this course is for you! We all very much identify with particular genres of music, particular artists, and perhaps particular instruments—why is this? In this section, students will learn how to write about music and genres of music and also learn about the process of creative songwriting. Welcome to the world of musical creativity! Some of the questions to be explored in this section: How do we talk about music and how do we talk about culture? How do we talk about these two different structures at the same time? In addition to pondering these questions, we will explore musicology and other helpful theoretical frameworks for learning about music and music makers. The methods for studying music are limitless! What are some typical musical abilities and how can they be developed or enhanced? What are some basic connections between particular neurology and musical ability?

Link to this FAQ

Erik Kaarla

This section will tap into the human passion of wanting to understand music, wanting to make music, and wanting to define music better. Whether you play an instrument or not—this course is for you! We all very much identify with particular genres of music, particular artists, and perhaps particular instruments—why is this? In this section, students will learn how to write about music and genres of music and also learn about the process of creative songwriting. Welcome to the world of musical creativity! Some of the questions to be explored in this section: How do we talk about music and how do we talk about culture? How do we talk about these two different structures at the same time? In addition to pondering these questions, we will explore musicology and other helpful theoretical frameworks for learning about music and music makers. The methods for studying music are limitless! What are some typical musical abilities and how can they be developed or enhanced? What are some basic connections between particular neurology and musical ability?

Link to this FAQ

David Kite

What do you want from life? Is real happiness possible? How do we find it both as individuals and within community? Centering on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, this course will take a deep dive into the most important question using fresh ideas from contemporary philosophy, psychology and evolutionary biology. You will take up big questions about ethics and personal character, justice, intellectual and experiential growth, friendship and pleasure as you develop your own ideas about what makes for a good life.

Link to this FAQ

David Kite

What do you want from life? Is real happiness possible? How do we find it both as individuals and within community? Centering on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, this course will take a deep dive into the most important question using fresh ideas from contemporary philosophy, psychology and evolutionary biology. You will take up big questions about ethics and personal character, justice, intellectual and experiential growth, friendship and pleasure as you develop your own ideas about what makes for a good life.

Link to this FAQ

Kristin Novotny

What does happiness mean? What makes it so desirable? How can we recognize and achieve it? What is unhappiness and why do we fear it? In this course, you'll read and write about your own understanding of the "good life," filtered through the lens of psychologists, philosophers, writers, and filmmakers who have tried in various mediums to unpack the notion of happiness itself.

Link to this FAQ

How do contemporary notions of what it means to have human rights intersect with the U.S. Constitution in a globalized world? Students will have the chance to explore complex questions about humanity and individuality as they begin to build an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will study the Constitution, Supreme Court rulings, and texts and artifacts from multiple disciplines. This course will also investigate the Constitution's influence on people's behavior and attitudes when doing business, negotiating, making policy and executive decisions, and dealing with employees. What Constitutional knowledge and experience is needed today when living in an international and globalized world?

Link to this FAQ

What do media depictions of crime tell us about how we perceive society? What do they tell us about how we think about justice and punishment? And how do we evaluate the accuracy of media accounts of crime, so that we can distinguish between what's real and what's entertainment? Students in this course will examine the ways in which perceptions of crime and justice are framed in, and influenced by, the news, social media, and popular culture. We will also consider the influence the media has on the criminal legal system and on public perceptions of crime, defendants, and the criminal legal system.

Link to this FAQ

This section has been cancelled.

Link to this FAQ

Clint Bryant

The horror genre has been and continues to be viewed as a lesser form of cinema. To counter this perception, in this course you will read and write about horror movies as an art form by analyzing its stories, themes, and aesthetics. You won't be writing reviews about whether or not a particular movie is good or bad. Instead, you will learn how to dig deep and examine the texts, subtexts, and contexts of horror films including the horror genre's roots in gothic literature. We will be watching a broad range of horror movies from subgenres like body horror, haunted houses, and possession so please take this fact into consideration when enrolling in this course as films will portray violence, gore, and address difficult topics.

Link to this FAQ

Clint Bryant

The horror genre has been and continues to be viewed as a lesser form of cinema. To counter this perception, in this course you will read and write about horror movies as an art form by analyzing its stories, themes, and aesthetics. You won't be writing reviews about whether or not a particular movie is good or bad. Instead, you will learn how to dig deep and examine the texts, subtexts, and contexts of horror films including the horror genre's roots in gothic literature. We will be watching a broad range of horror movies from subgenres like body horror, haunted houses, and possession so please take this fact into consideration when enrolling in this course as films will portray violence, gore, and address difficult topics.

Link to this FAQ

Clint Bryant

The horror genre has been and continues to be viewed as a lesser form of cinema. To counter this perception, in this course you will read and write about horror movies as an art form by analyzing its stories, themes, and aesthetics. You won't be writing reviews about whether or not a particular movie is good or bad. Instead, you will learn how to dig deep and examine the texts, subtexts, and contexts of horror films including the horror genre's roots in gothic literature. We will be watching a broad range of horror movies from subgenres like body horror, haunted houses, and possession so please take this fact into consideration when enrolling in this course as films will portray violence, gore, and address difficult topics.

Link to this FAQ

Frank Robinson

From Critical Race Theory to the death of George Floyd, from arguments for reparations to White Supremacist marches, and from Supreme Court definitions of equality to uncomfortable social media posts, race is a topic never far from risky conversation or public consternation. In this course we will explore our questions about race. What is race? Despite the civil rights movement 60 years ago, why is race still an issue? What are the stories about race in the U.S.? Drawing on autobiography, film, and history for answers -- and more questions -- the course will nurture the thinking skills of inquiry through reading, writing, and conversation.

Link to this FAQ

Frank Robinson

From Critical Race Theory to the death of George Floyd, from arguments for reparations to White Supremacist marches, and from Supreme Court definitions of equality to uncomfortable social media posts, race is a topic never far from risky conversation or public consternation. In this course we will explore our questions about race. What is race? Despite the civil rights movement 60 years ago, why is race still an issue? What are the stories about race in the U.S.? Drawing on autobiography, film, and history for answers -- and more questions -- the course will nurture the thinking skills of inquiry through reading, writing, and conversation.

Link to this FAQ

This section has been cancelled.

Link to this FAQ

David Rous

Why are men allowed to get angry but not cry, while women are allowed to cry but not get angry? Why are little boys sometimes told to suck it up and deal, but little girls sometimes get hugged and comforted? Why are girls often given pink things, but boys blue things? Why do boys typically receive trucks and legos and toy guns at Christmas, while girls often get dolls and things with unicorns on them? Why are young men allowed to indulge their sexual appetite, but young women are encouraged to control theirs? And what are the rules for people who don't fit into the traditional molds at all? In this section, we will explore why males and females are encouraged by society to do and be certain things, and why they are also encouraged not to do or be certain things. Through the lens of western popular culture, we will study how gender works and how it is changing in our times.

Link to this FAQ

David Rous

Why are men allowed to get angry but not cry, while women are allowed to cry but not get angry? Why are little boys sometimes told to suck it up and deal, but little girls sometimes get hugged and comforted? Why are girls often given pink things, but boys blue things? Why do boys typically receive trucks and legos and toy guns at Christmas, while girls often get dolls and things with unicorns on them? Why are young men allowed to indulge their sexual appetite, but young women are encouraged to control theirs? And what are the rules for people who don't fit into the traditional molds at all? In this section, we will explore why males and females are encouraged by society to do and be certain things, and why they are also encouraged not to do or be certain things. Through the lens of western popular culture, we will study how gender works and how it is changing in our times.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Bowen

Is banning books a violation of freedom of speech? Across the United States the practice of banning books is, once again, headline news. What factors are driving the recent hysteria? From small local school boards to state legislatures, the opposition voices are loud as they call for the removal of "controversial" books from public spaces. In 2021-2022 an estimated 1,600 titles were removed from the shelves and educators, in fear of repercussions, removed books from their classrooms. In COR 102 Reading, Writing, and Banned Books, we will examine: how students and critical thinking are impacted, what social constructs foster censorship, and how book banning affects society. In our critical reading and writing, we will explore why works with themes of race, racism, gender, sexuality, LGBTQ+, and memoir might become targets of a moral minority. We will evaluate how this practice creates disinformation and further marginalizes underrepresented communities.

Link to this FAQ

Bill Stratton

While Role Playing Games (as we currently understand them) were formed first from war games, they have since evolved to encompass a myriad of popular culture, including more "traditional" pen and paper, video games, novels (litRPG) movies, and even spawning immensely popular Youtube and other social media channels (such as Critical Role). As it's evolution continues, we'll be reading, writing, and experiencing these games in order to best examine their social, cultural, and philosophical impact, as well as learning about their history (and the history that inspired them), mythology, and ways in which they construct meaning from both the worlds created, and the world we live in.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas

Millions world-wide today share their lives with an animal they consider a member of the family. Why is that? How and why have humans developed relationships with other species for thousands of years? What roles do our furry, feathered, scaled and aquatic friends play in our lives, and we in theirs? Who "domesticated" whom? In this course, you'll practice college-level close-reading and analysis as well as academic writing by investigating the emotional, behavioral and commercial aspects to human-animal bonding and its far-reaching cultural impact.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas

Millions world-wide today share their lives with an animal they consider a member of the family. Why is that? How and why have humans developed relationships with other species for thousands of years? What roles do our furry, feathered, scaled and aquatic friends play in our lives, and we in theirs? Who "domesticated" whom? In this course, you'll practice college-level close-reading and analysis as well as academic writing by investigating the emotional, behavioral and commercial aspects to human-animal bonding and its far-reaching cultural impact.

Link to this FAQ

This section has been cancelled.

Link to this FAQ

This section has been cancelled.

Link to this FAQ

Ines de Haro

Have you ever wondered how the millions of soldiers fighting in wars all over the world have been fed during combat? How have countries been able to sustain those fighting abroad while simultaneously nourishing those not in the military? Why is so much of our food's shelf life insensitive to time? In this course you will examine how war's impacts on our diet is connected to the foods we eat on a day-to-day basis due to the food provisioning systems implemented during war. By examining this course through the lenses of historical analysis, scientific research methods, and economics, one will discover that the convergence of military members' and average civilians' palates are more similar than you may think.

Link to this FAQ

Bill Stratton

While Role Playing Games (as we currently understand them) were formed first from war games, they have since evolved to encompass a myriad of popular culture, including more "traditional" pen and paper, video games, novels (litRPG) movies, and even spawning immensely popular Youtube and other social media channels (such as Critical Role). As it's evolution continues, we'll be reading, writing, and experiencing these games in order to best examine their social, cultural, and philosophical impact, as well as learning about their history (and the history that inspired them), mythology, and ways in which they construct meaning from both the worlds created, and the world we live in.

Link to this FAQ

Bill Stratton

While Role Playing Games (as we currently understand them) were formed first from war games, they have since evolved to encompass a myriad of popular culture, including more "traditional" pen and paper, video games, novels (litRPG) movies, and even spawning immensely popular Youtube and other social media channels (such as Critical Role). As it's evolution continues, we'll be reading, writing, and experiencing these games in order to best examine their social, cultural, and philosophical impact, as well as learning about their history (and the history that inspired them), mythology, and ways in which they construct meaning from both the worlds created, and the world we live in.

Link to this FAQ

Spring Semester

COR 103 | Navigating Your Information Landscape

What makes an argument good or bad? What counts as evidence in our post-truth world? How can you understand and assess the truth value of a claim when you're not an expert? In this course you'll learn rhetorical strategies about how to examine arguments and types of evidence in different disciplines and fields of study. To help learn these strategies, you will do close readings of texts from a variety of disciplines in the liberal arts and sciences, popular culture, and social media.

COR 104 | First Year Inquiry (FYI): Making, Doing, and ____

This course introduces you to interdisciplinary inquiry using applied, project-based, and/or experiential methods. Regardless of the specific course focus, you'll have opportunities for making and doing interdisciplinary knowledge creation through a variety of approaches and activities. You will collaborate with other students, iterate on ideas, and work to develop a project.

You can explore the Spring 2023 FYI topics below. Please note that current and previous topics are not guaranteed to be available in future semesters.

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Jonathan Banfill

Sound is an essential element of any place, including cities. The city is full of sounds both human and non-human, and through listening to them we can learn more about the world we inhabit. This course will ask you to listen to the city, in this case Burlington to better understand the places we live in. Conceptually, we will examine different ways of understanding cities through sound, drawing from musicology, sonic art, urban studies, and other creative media projects. We will practice methods for listening and recording the sounds we encounter, via place-based investigations of specific locations, creating a digital "archive" of city sounds. For the final project, we will make an album of sonic essays, for instance creating an audio portrait of a single street, which communicates a sense of the places we encounter in our everyday lives.

Link to this FAQ

Jonathan Banfill

Sound is an essential element of any place, including cities. The city is full of sounds both human and non-human, and through listening to them we can learn more about the world we inhabit. This course will ask you to listen to the city, in this case Burlington to better understand the places we live in. Conceptually, we will examine different ways of understanding cities through sound, drawing from musicology, sonic art, urban studies, and other creative media projects. We will practice methods for listening and recording the sounds we encounter, via place-based investigations of specific locations, creating a digital "archive" of city sounds. For the final project, we will make an album of sonic essays, for instance creating an audio portrait of a single street, which communicates a sense of the places we encounter in our everyday lives.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Bowen

This section is an interactive workshop in interpersonal communications. Through a series of seemingly simple group interactions: a tea party, a political debate, sending Valentines, we will dissect the layered and complex dynamics of human behavior. How do you conduct yourself, express yourself, and foster relationships? Starting on campus, this class will explore the mechanics of relationships and the importance of building tangible community ties. We will consider the societal benefits of developing strong personal and social connections. We will examine how human interaction has shifted in the digital age and discuss the personal and community impacts of the COVID-19 quarantine.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Bowen

This section is an interactive workshop in interpersonal communications. Through a series of seemingly simple group interactions: a tea party, a political debate, sending Valentines, we will dissect the layered and complex dynamics of human behavior. How do you conduct yourself, express yourself, and foster relationships? Starting on campus, this class will explore the mechanics of relationships and the importance of building tangible community ties. We will consider the societal benefits of developing strong personal and social connections. We will examine how human interaction has shifted in the digital age and discuss the personal and community impacts of the COVID-19 quarantine.

Link to this FAQ

Al Capone

In this class students will explore ethical problems which they will face as professionals. Working with program faculty and various campus offices, students will make a portfolio of case studies to which they can refer and contribute in the future.

Link to this FAQ

Al Capone

In this class students will explore ethical problems which they will face as professionals. Working with program faculty and various campus offices, students will make a portfolio of case studies to which they can refer and contribute in the future.

Link to this FAQ

Blake Randell

We will first explore why we should advocate for the "forgotten" (or even "neglected") instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) of the care of pets among people with a disability, people who are 65 years and over, and people who are 65 years and over with a disability to reduce social isolation and loneliness. We will then explore how we can collaborate to provide supports and remove barriers or hindrances to the care of pets to improve (or enhance) the health, well-being, and quality of life of those whose goal is to age in place with pets by identifying problems in case studies which, once solved, will be distributed as handouts to a network of independent-living, assisted-living, and special-purpose housing communities in the Greater Burlington Area that represent these vulnerable, and diverse, populations.

Link to this FAQ

Isabella Jeso

Do you love garment making? Do you love to explore justice issues, relating to labor practices such as livable wages, discriminatory practices based on gender, race, and culture? Do you love to explore alternatives for workers caught in the vortex created by such professional issues? If so, look no further! This course takes students on a learning journey, through relevant case studies from recent history in the garment industry, involving Latinx workers. Launching the course from Josefina Lopez' play, made into a film, about gender discrimination in the garment industry, you will explore relevant topics, using multi-media formats: texts, videos, film, blogs, podcasts. Collaborative learning, through small group discussions, will be conducted in every class meeting and on our Canvas Course site. Work through Google JamBoards and Google Shared Docs will add to our collaboration efforts. Students will also be treated to sewing their own chosen small but practical items such as these: scrunchies; jogging belt; body pillow case; fabric bookmarks; tech device cord keeper; (https://sewing.com/easy-sewing-projects-gifts-teens/). The course will culminate in a research project, asking students to integrate their semester-long takeaways. So, come have fun with your instructor, sewing usable things; reading, thinking, discussing, and writing, about labor justice and equity.

Link to this FAQ

Isabella Jeso

Do you love garment making? Do you love to explore justice issues, relating to labor practices such as livable wages, discriminatory practices based on gender, race, and culture? Do you love to explore alternatives for workers caught in the vortex created by such professional issues? If so, look no further! This course takes students on a learning journey, through relevant case studies from recent history in the garment industry, involving Latinx workers. Launching the course from Josefina Lopez' play, made into a film, about gender discrimination in the garment industry, you will explore relevant topics, using multi-media formats: texts, videos, film, blogs, podcasts. Collaborative learning, through small group discussions, will be conducted in every class meeting and on our Canvas Course site. Work through Google JamBoards and Google Shared Docs will add to our collaboration efforts. Students will also be treated to sewing their own chosen small but practical items such as these: scrunchies; jogging belt; body pillow case; fabric bookmarks; tech device cord keeper; (https://sewing.com/easy-sewing-projects-gifts-teens/). The course will culminate in a research project, asking students to integrate their semester-long takeaways. So, come have fun with your instructor, sewing usable things; reading, thinking, discussing, and writing, about labor justice and equity.

Link to this FAQ

Isabella Jeso

Do you love garment making? Do you love to explore justice issues, relating to labor practices such as livable wages, discriminatory practices based on gender, race, and culture? Do you love to explore alternatives for workers caught in the vortex created by such professional issues? If so, look no further! This course takes students on a learning journey, through relevant case studies from recent history in the garment industry, involving Latinx workers. Launching the course from Josefina Lopez' play, made into a film, about gender discrimination in the garment industry, you will explore relevant topics, using multi-media formats: texts, videos, film, blogs, podcasts. Collaborative learning, through small group discussions, will be conducted in every class meeting and on our Canvas Course site. Work through Google JamBoards and Google Shared Docs will add to our collaboration efforts. Students will also be treated to sewing their own chosen small but practical items such as these: scrunchies; jogging belt; body pillow case; fabric bookmarks; tech device cord keeper; (https://sewing.com/easy-sewing-projects-gifts-teens/). The course will culminate in a research project, asking students to integrate their semester-long takeaways. So, come have fun with your instructor, sewing usable things; reading, thinking, discussing, and writing, about labor justice and equity.

Link to this FAQ

David Kite

The health and wellness benefits of a practice of meditation are well known today but many practitioners find meditation is also uniquely capable of offering deep insights into the nature of the self and ultimate reality. This course will ask students to cultivate a meditative practice in collaboration with others while we will also study texts (ancient and contemporary) about the meaning of meditation.

Link to this FAQ

David Kite

The health and wellness benefits of a practice of meditation are well known today but many practitioners find meditation is also uniquely capable of offering deep insights into the nature of the self and ultimate reality. This course will ask students to cultivate a meditative practice in collaboration with others while we will also study texts (ancient and contemporary) about the meaning of meditation.

Link to this FAQ

Fia Moser-Hardy

How do you find a story? How do you craft one? Why are stories important? What stories are yours to tell and which ones belong to others? Explore stories in a variety of ways: oral storytelling, personal narrative, journalistic investigation, retelling traditional stories through the written word, fictional stories, stories told through the creative and performing arts, and stories told through social media. Learn and recreate stories from around the world while discovering the stories that are truly yours to tell-over and over again in a multitude of ways.

Link to this FAQ

Fia Moser-Hardy

How do you find a story? How do you craft one? Why are stories important? What stories are yours to tell and which ones belong to others? Explore stories in a variety of ways: oral storytelling, personal narrative, journalistic investigation, retelling traditional stories through the written word, fictional stories, stories told through the creative and performing arts, and stories told through social media. Learn and recreate stories from around the world while discovering the stories that are truly yours to tell-over and over again in a multitude of ways.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom

Why does learning have to happen indoors? The tradition of outdoor education shows us that having adventures together teaches collaboration, self-reliance, and empathy. We can also think about what we gain when we break down walls - literal and metaphoric - and begin to interact directly with the world around us. Being outside changes us; learning is no longer transactional, but transformational. Plus, being outside is way more fun.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom

Why does learning have to happen indoors? The tradition of outdoor education shows us that having adventures together teaches collaboration, self-reliance, and empathy. We can also think about what we gain when we break down walls - literal and metaphoric - and begin to interact directly with the world around us. Being outside changes us; learning is no longer transactional, but transformational. Plus, being outside is way more fun.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom

Why does learning have to happen indoors? The tradition of outdoor education shows us that having adventures together teaches collaboration, self-reliance, and empathy. We can also think about what we gain when we break down walls - literal and metaphoric - and begin to interact directly with the world around us. Being outside changes us; learning is no longer transactional, but transformational. Plus, being outside is way more fun.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom

Why does learning have to happen indoors? The tradition of outdoor education shows us that having adventures together teaches collaboration, self-reliance, and empathy. We can also think about what we gain when we break down walls - literal and metaphoric - and begin to interact directly with the world around us. Being outside changes us; learning is no longer transactional, but transformational. Plus, being outside is way more fun.

Link to this FAQ

Steve Wehmeyer

From The Karate Kid, to Kung-fu Panda, from Mortal Kombat to Street Fighter and Enter the Dragon -- Martial Arts intrigue us, excite us, terrify us and inspire us. This section takes an interdisciplinary approach to exploring multi-cultural martial arts in multiple contexts. We'll look at the philosophical, bio-medical, religious, historical, and cultural underpinnings of a number of martial and related fitness traditions. We'll explore their relations to systems of power and privilege, resistance and oppression. We'll have the opportunity to explore these arts at first hand - learning from experts in the local community, and consider those arts as systems of conflict resolution and embodied vernacular tradition. We'll examine the depiction of combat arts in popular culture and media and explore how a visceral understanding of these ways can open our minds and bodies to a deeper understanding of the cultures that create them

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Steve Wehmeyer

From The Karate Kid, to Kung-fu Panda, from Mortal Kombat to Street Fighter and Enter the Dragon -- Martial Arts intrigue us, excite us, terrify us and inspire us. This section takes an interdisciplinary approach to exploring multi-cultural martial arts in multiple contexts. We'll look at the philosophical, bio-medical, religious, historical, and cultural underpinnings of a number of martial and related fitness traditions. We'll explore their relations to systems of power and privilege, resistance and oppression. We'll have the opportunity to explore these arts at first hand - learning from experts in the local community, and consider those arts as systems of conflict resolution and embodied vernacular tradition. We'll examine the depiction of combat arts in popular culture and media and explore how a visceral understanding of these ways can open our minds and bodies to a deeper understanding of the cultures that create them

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Ines de Haro

Food is an intrinsic part of life. It is an identity that is ingrained into our cultures, heritages, families, and societies. In whichever way food identity exists in ours lives, it ultimately has to arrive to our plates or hands in one way, through the means of those who grow it. This class is designed to understand the concepts of all things food and farming socioeconomically, historically, and culturally. In 'Foodies and Farmers,' you will actually get to cook historical recipes, engage in conversation and work with with local Vermont meat, vegetable and dairy farmers, experience elements of what the cultural restaurant food industry Burlington, VT, has to offer, work with local chefs, and even help Professor de Haro plant her garden!

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Ines de Haro

Food is an intrinsic part of life. It is an identity that is ingrained into our cultures, heritages, families, and societies. In whichever way food identity exists in ours lives, it ultimately has to arrive to our plates or hands in one way, through the means of those who grow it. This class is designed to understand the concepts of all things food and farming socioeconomically, historically, and culturally. In 'Foodies and Farmers,' you will actually get to cook historical recipes, engage in conversation and work with with local Vermont meat, vegetable and dairy farmers, experience elements of what the cultural restaurant food industry Burlington, VT, has to offer, work with local chefs, and even help Professor de Haro plant her garden!

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Amanda Young

In a world brimming with diverse individuals, ideologies, and experiences, how do we bridge the gaps and form meaningful connections? What does it take to truly connect in an age where physical and digital interactions shape our relationships? This section offers a deep dive into the dynamics of human connection. Through interactive workshops, experiential activities, and collaborative projects, students will explore the art and science of forging bonds. Delving into the realms of psychology, communication studies, and digital humanities, we'll examine the challenges and joys of connecting in a rapidly evolving world. From understanding non-verbal cues in face-to-face interactions to navigating the complexities of online relationships, this journey promises to enrich students' perspectives on the myriad ways we connect, relate, and belong.

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Katheryn Wright

Alternate reality games (ARGs) are a type of interactive narrative that connects actual and virtual spaces through stories and gameplay across multiple media platforms. Players usually encounter puzzles, find clues hidden in different locations and then, collectively, piece the information they learn together with others to create a story. We will analyze different examples and uses of ARGs and then work in teams to write ARG concept proposals. We will go through a selection process and, as a class, implement one or more of the games we propose on Champlain College's campus.

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Zachary Lamalfa

In this course, we will examine what montage and collage techniques, under a broad definition (collage and bricolage in visual art; cento and cut-up techniques in poetry and fiction; editing techniques in film and video; remix, quoting, and sampling in music; etc.) can do for us in our efforts to represent and interpret our world. We'll look at how randomized and chance techniques produce unexpected meaning, as well as reveal our concerns and fixations through unconscious associations. We'll challenge conventional ideas of "originality" and "creativity" in our respective fields and interest areas. And we'll consider the ways artists, designers, writers, filmmakers, activists, and others use deliberate combinations and juxtapositions to express complex ideas in mere instants. Students will develop their own montage- and collage-based projects, learning to make deliberate statements and arguments through these methods, and to uncover existing nuances in their own interests and ideas. No artistic background is required for this course! We'll learn to utilize these tools and techniques as a group.

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Zachary Lamalfa

In this course, we will examine what montage and collage techniques, under a broad definition (collage and bricolage in visual art; cento and cut-up techniques in poetry and fiction; editing techniques in film and video; remix, quoting, and sampling in music; etc.) can do for us in our efforts to represent and interpret our world. We'll look at how randomized and chance techniques produce unexpected meaning, as well as reveal our concerns and fixations through unconscious associations. We'll challenge conventional ideas of "originality" and "creativity" in our respective fields and interest areas. And we'll consider the ways artists, designers, writers, filmmakers, activists, and others use deliberate combinations and juxtapositions to express complex ideas in mere instants. Students will develop their own montage- and collage-based projects, learning to make deliberate statements and arguments through these methods, and to uncover existing nuances in their own interests and ideas. No artistic background is required for this course! We'll learn to utilize these tools and techniques as a group.

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Gordon Glover

Students independently and collaboratively produce and disseminate persuasive activist multimedia messages that address critical social issues and advocate for social and cultural change.

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Erik Shonstrom

Why does learning have to happen indoors? The tradition of outdoor education shows us that having adventures together teaches collaboration, self-reliance, and empathy. We can also think about what we gain when we break down walls - literal and metaphoric - and begin to interact directly with the world around us. Being outside changes us; learning is no longer transactional, but transformational. Plus, being outside is way more fun.

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