Second Year Experience

In your second year at Champlain, you'll choose from a wide variety of Core classes. These classes each develop and expand on the skills you practiced in your first year, while introducing new concepts.

You'll choose two different Core courses in the fall semester and another two Core courses in the spring semester—you can browse the course sections below and read more by clicking on each section title.

FALL SEMESTER

COR 201 | Core Foundations: Making Meaning through Science

Science holds an elevated place in society. The knowledge and meaning that science makes are seen as having a particular and special value. This course explores knowledge and meaning making in order to allow a thoughtful analysis of, and then engagement with, science as a way of knowing, and then engages with the methods and theories of the sciences themselves, to understand the analytical, creative, and generative possibilities of science.

COR 202 | Interdisciplinary Perspectives on _____

While each section of COR 202 addresses a different problem, issue, or topic, they all focus on interdisciplinary research. You will collect, analyze, and assess information from different disciplines in order to recognize patterns, contextualize arguments and synthesize ideas while collaborating on a project. Emphasis will be placed on helping you translate and apply what you learn about interdisciplinary research to other professional contexts.

Expand All
Collapse All

Jonathan Banfill - T/F 2:30-3:45pm

Should everyone have the right to a home that is safe, secure, and affordable? Can such a right to home be provided in our contemporary cities and world, where issues such as gentrification and the rising cost of living create displacement and unequal access to housing? This section examines concepts of home and efforts to create housing equality from an interdisciplinary perspective, including history, sociology, urban planning policy, architecture and design, and the creative arts (film, literature, and art). Drawing from local (Burlington), national, and global examples, the course utilizes a Right to the City framework-as developed by social theorists and urban activists-to engage students with creative and interdisciplinary solutions to a major social problem of our time. 

Link to this FAQ

Jonathan Banfill - T/F 4:00-5:15pm

Should everyone have the right to a home that is safe, secure, and affordable? Can such a right to home be provided in our contemporary cities and world, where issues such as gentrification and the rising cost of living create displacement and unequal access to housing? This section examines concepts of home and efforts to create housing equality from an interdisciplinary perspective, including history, sociology, urban planning policy, architecture and design, and the creative arts (film, literature, and art). Drawing from local (Burlington), national, and global examples, the course utilizes a Right to the City framework-as developed by social theorists and urban activists-to engage students with creative and interdisciplinary solutions to a major social problem of our time. 

Link to this FAQ

Lionel Beasley - M/TH 1:00-2:15pm

What can we do in the near- and long-term to prevent, mitigate, or survive climate change? In this section we will explore the phenomenon of human-driven climate change through the disciplinary approaches of science, history, and economics. We will consider the scientific research and note the clear effects of climate change observable in the world today. We will examine the history of the fossil fuel industry and the vast fortunes created by "black gold." We will consider the effects of the search for and extraction of oil and gas, as colonial enterprises, on societies in oil-rich areas with a focus on the Mid-East and Africa. We will study the social effects of past volcanic climate-change events, and we will consider our potential future in a changed world, humanity in the aftermath. And most importantly, we will seek solutions by engaging in group research projects. 

Link to this FAQ

Jennifer Berger - T/F 10:00-11:15am

What is art? What is public space? What role does public art play in the art world and in society? In addition to street artists, like Banksy, we'll look at graffiti, murals, sculptures, and installations that change the way we experience an environment. Using interdisciplinary methods, we will develop skills to understand and analyze how art and public spaces interact with each other, and with us. Students will work in groups to design a piece of public art that has a specific intended purpose, and will use interdisciplinary methods to develop their work.

Link to this FAQ

Aziz Fatnassi - T 4:00-6:45pm

How do conceptions of space and place influence the formation and maintenance of identities of all kinds (those of individuals, groups, regions, institutions, and ecosystems)? In recent memory, public spaces have served as an important site for contesting and expressing identities via social manifestations, collective protest, and mass uprisings. In this section we will explore these three interrelated concepts (space, place, and identity) via interdisciplinary case studies that engage different communities around the globe. We will use ethnographic methods to extend these global insights to Burlington, and explore how COVID-19 impacts the use and design of various public spaces. We will conclude by exploring how we can redesign and reconceptualize space and places to positively impact our responses to pressing issues including social justice, climate change, and emergent crises. 

Link to this FAQ

Isabela Jeso - T/F 8:30-9:45am

How do you know what you know about your world? This section begins with the assumption that in exploring ways of knowing through reading and writing about these texts, we discover new knowledge, in part, as we read and write at a deep level of inquiry. This section will help you define ways of knowing and create your own repertoire of strategic approaches to identify how you know what you know, problem-solve in real-time and prepare for the future. So, come and let's have fun together!

Link to this FAQ

Isabela Jeso - T/F 10:00-11:15am

How do you know what you know about your world? This section begins with the assumption that in exploring ways of knowing through reading and writing about these texts, we discover new knowledge, in part, as we read and write at a deep level of inquiry. This section will help you define ways of knowing and create your own repertoire of strategic approaches to identify how you know what you know, problem-solve in real-time and prepare for the future. So, come and let's have fun together!

Link to this FAQ

Kathryn Leo-Nyquist - M/TH 4:00-5:15pm

What is freedom of thought? In this section we'll explore the evolution of this concept in the modern world since the invention of the printing press. To do this we'll focus on four large themes: (1) freedom of religion & the rise of science; (2) the denial of freedom of thought under totalitarian regimes (propaganda indoctrination, & misinformation); (3) the manipulation of thought in a commercial culture (advertising, public relations, political consulting, & data mining); and (4) democratizing the media. We'll divide into collaborative theme groups and use an interdisciplinary design and perspective to research these topics, present our findings, and discuss the implications. 

Link to this FAQ

Rowshan Nemazee - M/TH 2:30-3:45pm

How can art contribute to our understanding of injustices in the world? In this section, we will bring feminist studies, race and multicultural studies to bear on this question. We will also explore the ways that art can enhance our visions of creating a more just world through visible, living documents. The task of understanding these matters will involve feminist studies, race and multicultural studies.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder - M/TH 8:30-9:45am

Who is the Monkey King? Few characters have had a more pervasive—and joyous—impact on popular culture than Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, from Wu Cheng'en's Journey to the West. However, what are his origins, and is there more going on in the novel than simply his epic shenanigans? Students will explore the Monkey King and the novel through a number of lenses: religious, feminist, Marxist, literary, and historical.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder - M/TH 10:00-11:15am

Who is the Monkey King? Few characters have had a more pervasive—and joyous—impact on popular culture than Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, from Wu Cheng'en's Journey to the West. However, what are his origins, and is there more going on in the novel than simply his epic shenanigans? Students will explore the Monkey King and the novel through a number of lenses: religious, feminist, Marxist, literary, and historical.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom - T 8:30-11:15am

Who's in the driver's seat? We often assume our brain is directing behavior, making decisions. But the science of embodied cognition offers a much more complex picture. Our bodies, evolutionary history, and subjective sensorimotor perception are guiding our daily lives much more than we think. This section is an interdisciplinary exploration of the way in which the body's interaction with our environment dictates behavior: it makes us who we are. We'll move, smell, taste, listen, dance (salsa, anyone?) and move our bodies to understand how our bodies aren't just part of us; they are us. 

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom - T 11:30am-2:15pm

Who's in the driver's seat? We often assume our brain is directing behavior, making decisions. But the science of embodied cognition offers a much more complex picture. Our bodies, evolutionary history, and subjective sensorimotor perception are guiding our daily lives much more than we think. This section is an interdisciplinary exploration of the way in which the body's interaction with our environment dictates behavior: it makes us who we are. We'll move, smell, taste, listen, dance (salsa, anyone?) and move our bodies to understand how our bodies aren't just part of us; they are us. 

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas - M/TH 11:30am-12:45pm

How can we best understand sexuality and sexual desire? As humans, we are sexual creatures, yet sexual desire is often viewed by society as taboo and carefully regulated. This section examines potential reasons why, and subsequent repercussions. This is not a how-to course on human sexuality; rather, we will inquire into how we are (or are not) formally educated about sexual desire; how our beliefs about sex and sexuality are formed through religious traditions and cultural expectations; how we encounter representations of sex through visual and performing art, and media; and how industries and laws have formed to sell and regulate sexual content.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas - M/TH 2:30-3:45pm

How can we best understand sexuality and sexual desire? As humans, we are sexual creatures, yet sexual desire is often viewed by society as taboo and carefully regulated. This section examines potential reasons why, and subsequent repercussions. This is not a how-to course on human sexuality; rather, we will inquire into how we are (or are not) formally educated about sexual desire; how our beliefs about sex and sexuality are formed through religious traditions and cultural expectations; how we encounter representations of sex through visual and performing art, and media; and how industries and laws have formed to sell and regulate sexual content.

Link to this FAQ

Katheryn Wright - T/F 10:00-11:15am

Is plant-based meat the future of food? In this section, we will interrogate the economics and politics of plant-based products, and dig into the historical, cultural, and transcultural meanings of fake meat. Underpinning our investigation of fake meat will be an introduction to posthuman studies, which asks us to recalibrate what it means to be human by focusing on the connections between humans and technology, nonhuman species, and our collective lived environments. What you discover will inevitably lead us to more philosophical questions, like how does fake meat shift the relationship between humans, animals, technology, and our environment? Is plant-based meat fake, a simulation or copy, or is it asking us to redefine what counts as meat? How is the future of food-recognizing that food not only sustains but determines the very essence of live-connected to the idea of an emerging posthuman subjectivity? You don't have to be a vegan or vegetarian to take this course nor will it be advocating for you to become one. Instead, we will dig into the intersection of food, science, technology, culture, identity, and power from multiple perspectives. Be prepared to never look at a burger in the same way again!

Link to this FAQ

Katheryn Wright - T/F 11:30am-12:45pm

Is plant-based meat the future of food? In this section, we will interrogate the economics and politics of plant-based products, and dig into the historical, cultural, and transcultural meanings of fake meat. Underpinning our investigation of fake meat will be an introduction to posthuman studies, which asks us to recalibrate what it means to be human by focusing on the connections between humans and technology, nonhuman species, and our collective lived environments. What you discover will inevitably lead us to more philosophical questions, like how does fake meat shift the relationship between humans, animals, technology, and our environment? Is plant-based meat fake, a simulation or copy, or is it asking us to redefine what counts as meat? How is the future of food-recognizing that food not only sustains but determines the very essence of live-connected to the idea of an emerging posthuman subjectivity? You don't have to be a vegan or vegetarian to take this course nor will it be advocating for you to become one. Instead, we will dig into the intersection of food, science, technology, culture, identity, and power from multiple perspectives. Be prepared to never look at a burger in the same way again!

Link to this FAQ

SPRING SEMESTER

COR 203 | Core Foundations: Making Meaning through Culture

Culture impacts everything we do, experience, and learn, but what is culture? Where does it come from, how does it form, and why does it have such a wide and deep impact on people's lives? This course explores culture as a system of meaning and meaning-making in order to allow for a more thoughtful analysis of, and then engagement with, cultural texts and media using different methodological approaches.

COR 204 | Theoretical Perspectives on _____

In this course, you will go in depth about a theoretical perspective that asks you to interrogate systems of power and power relationships. You will learn about the history of that perspective, including how it too was shaped by multiple contexts and compares with other viewpoints. You will use that perspective to analyze a specific topic, collection of texts, or cultural phenomena.

Course Section Details Coming Soon!