Second-Year Experience

Students in Core Year 2 Painting a Mural

In your second year at Champlain, you'll dive into science and culture, deeply exploring relationships between the two.

How does perspective affect science? How does science affect culture? Through projects, research, and discussions, you'll practice examining the contexts and sources of knowledge.

You'll take one Foundations course and one Perspectives course each semester of year two. In the Foundations courses, you'll develop the set of skills you'll use to explore, analyze, and interrogate ideas in the Perspectives courses of your choice.

FALL SEMESTER

COR 201 | Core Foundations: Making Meaning through Science

Science holds an elevated place in society. The knowledge and meaning that science makes are seen as having a particular and special value. This course explores knowledge and meaning making in order to allow a thoughtful analysis of, and then engagement with, science as a way of knowing, and then engages with the methods and theories of the sciences themselves, to understand the analytical, creative, and generative possibilities of science.

COR 202 | Interdisciplinary Perspectives on _____

While each section of COR 202 addresses a different problem, issue, or topic, they all focus on interdisciplinary research. You will collect, analyze, and assess information from different disciplines in order to recognize patterns, contextualize arguments and synthesize ideas while collaborating on a project. Emphasis will be placed on helping you translate and apply what you learn about interdisciplinary research to other professional contexts.

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Martha Moreno-Linares

For centuries, writing about health and illness seemed to be reserved to medical professionals, but recently there is a growing trend of individuals sharing their own experiences as patients or caregivers. Among these first-hand accounts of illness, many artists are turning to the medium of comics to offer their own perspectives on issues of illness (both physical and mental), disability, and the isolation that patients often experience. In this course we will use a graphic memoir about the author's experience with epilepsy caused by a brain tumor to explore larger questions such as: Can memories be collective? Is illness really an individual experience? How can comics express emotions when words fail? To study these issues, we will use different theoretical lenses to understand the intersection between comics and medicine.

Link to this FAQ

Ed Cafferty

Humans have lived together in groups for thousands of years. They have had conflicts with each other. They sometimes treat others as equals but often they don't. They may dominate others through beliefs, norms, values, violence, and laws. This course will explore the many ways people interact with each other and how relationships have change over time. 

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Ed Cafferty

Humans have lived together in groups for thousands of years. They have had conflicts with each other. They sometimes treat others as equals but often they don't. They may dominate others through beliefs, norms, values, violence, and laws. This course will explore the many ways people interact with each other and how relationships have change over time. 

Link to this FAQ

Veruska Cantelli

This semester we will take a journey to unpack the complexity and dynamic force of postcolonial identity. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will lean on film and short theory readings in order to unpack the nuances of postcolonial realities.

Amongst others, we will tackle the works of the following filmmakers: Ousmane Sembène, Abderrahmane Sissako, Deepa Mehta, Gillo Pontecorvo, Mira Nair, and Lee Tamahori. We will follow a Senegalese woman trapped into a racial web of a white French bourgeois household, dive into the clash of introspection and violence in contemporary Vietnam, unpack women voices out of India, and more; all of this through the guiding force of challenging our assumptions and being inspired by, and learning from, a non-western lens.

The specificity and uniqueness of the language of postcolonial cinema will be a crucial part of our work. In addition to viewing films, we will be reading essays in Postcolonial Studies, Feminist Theory, and Cinema Studies.

Link to this FAQ

Veruska Cantelli

This semester we will take a journey to unpack the complexity and dynamic force of postcolonial identity. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will lean on film and short theory readings in order to unpack the nuances of postcolonial realities.

Amongst others, we will tackle the works of the following filmmakers: Ousmane Sembène, Abderrahmane Sissako, Deepa Mehta, Gillo Pontecorvo, Mira Nair, and Lee Tamahori. We will follow a Senegalese woman trapped into a racial web of a white French bourgeois household, dive into the clash of introspection and violence in contemporary Vietnam, unpack women voices out of India, and more; all of this through the guiding force of challenging our assumptions and being inspired by, and learning from, a non-western lens.

The specificity and uniqueness of the language of postcolonial cinema will be a crucial part of our work. In addition to viewing films, we will be reading essays in Postcolonial Studies, Feminist Theory, and Cinema Studies.

Link to this FAQ

Aziz Fatnassi

How do conceptions of space and place influence the formation and maintenance of identities of all kinds (those of individuals, groups, regions, institutions, and ecosystems)? In recent memory, public spaces have served as an important site for contesting and expressing identities via social manifestations, collective protest, and mass uprisings.

In this section, we will explore these three interrelated concepts (space, place, and identity) via interdisciplinary case studies that engage different communities around the globe. We will use ethnographic methods to extend these global insights to Burlington, and explore how COVID-19 impacts the use and design of various public spaces. We will conclude by exploring how we can redesign and reconceptualize space and places to positively impact our responses to pressing issues including social justice, climate change, and emergent crises. 

Link to this FAQ

Isabella Jeso

How do you know what you know about your world? Why is it important to define ways of knowing that are best for you? How does creating your own repertoire of your strategic approaches to how you know what you know, help you to problem-solve in real-time and to prepare for future needs? What is a way of knowing anyway?

Our study of Interdisciplinary Perspectives will culminate in a research essay, where you will design your own composite big ideas, representing your final thoughts on how you know what you know. Your instructor will take you on this adventure, through selected great books and technology-delivered learning materials, helping you to design your own ways of knowing. Moreover, there will be exciting, respectful, debates and conversations with other students in your Champlain College learning community. So, come and let's have fun together!

Link to this FAQ

Isabella Jeso

How do you know what you know about your world? Why is it important to define ways of knowing that are best for you? How does creating your own repertoire of your strategic approaches to how you know what you know, help you to problem-solve in real-time and to prepare for future needs? What is a way of knowing anyway?

Our study of Interdisciplinary Perspectives will culminate in a research essay, where you will design your own composite big ideas, representing your final thoughts on how you know what you know. Your instructor will take you on this adventure, through selected great books and technology-delivered learning materials, helping you to design your own ways of knowing. Moreover, there will be exciting, respectful, debates and conversations with other students in your Champlain College learning community. So, come and let's have fun together!

Link to this FAQ

Rowshan Nemazee

How can art contribute to our understanding of injustices in the world? In this section, we will bring feminist studies, race and multicultural studies to bear on this question. We will also explore the ways that art can enhance our visions of creating a more just world through visible, living documents. The task of understanding these matters will involve feminist studies, race and multicultural studies.

Link to this FAQ

Rowshan Nemazee

How can art contribute to our understanding of injustices in the world? In this section, we will bring feminist studies, race and multicultural studies to bear on this question. We will also explore the ways that art can enhance our visions of creating a more just world through visible, living documents. The task of understanding these matters will involve feminist studies, race and multicultural studies.

Link to this FAQ

Flavio Rizzo

This semester we will take a journey to unpack the complexity and dynamic force of postcolonial identity. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will lean on film and short theory readings in order to unpack the nuances of postcolonial realities.

Amongst others, we will tackle the works of the following filmmakers: Ousmane Sembène, Abderrahmane Sissako, Deepa Mehta, Gillo Pontecorvo, Mira Nair, and Lee Tamahori. We will follow a Senegalese woman trapped into a racial web of a white French bourgeois household, dive into the clash of introspection and violence in contemporary Vietnam, unpack women voices out of India, and more; all of this through the guiding force of challenging our assumptions and being inspired by, and learning from, a non-western lens.

The specificity and uniqueness of the language of postcolonial cinema will be a crucial part of our work. In addition to viewing films, we will be reading essays in Postcolonial Studies, Feminist Theory, and Cinema Studies.

Link to this FAQ

Flavio Rizzo

This semester we will take a journey to unpack the complexity and dynamic force of postcolonial identity. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will lean on film and short theory readings in order to unpack the nuances of postcolonial realities.

Amongst others, we will tackle the works of the following filmmakers: Ousmane Sembène, Abderrahmane Sissako, Deepa Mehta, Gillo Pontecorvo, Mira Nair, and Lee Tamahori. We will follow a Senegalese woman trapped into a racial web of a white French bourgeois household, dive into the clash of introspection and violence in contemporary Vietnam, unpack women voices out of India, and more; all of this through the guiding force of challenging our assumptions and being inspired by, and learning from, a non-western lens.

The specificity and uniqueness of the language of postcolonial cinema will be a crucial part of our work. In addition to viewing films, we will be reading essays in Postcolonial Studies, Feminist Theory, and Cinema Studies.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder

Just as for millennia the Bedouin have moved ceaselessly through the desert, they have also moved through the popular imagination, inspiring prophets, historians, philosophers, artists, and poets. In this class, students will study the Bedouin through an interdisciplinary lens.

This section of COR 202 includes a trip to Jordan led by Gary Scudder and Cyndi Brandenberg. Students must apply to take this section.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder

Who is the Monkey King? Few characters have had a more pervasive—and joyous—impact on popular culture than Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, from Wu Cheng'en's Journey to the West. However, what are his origins, and is there more going on in the novel than simply his epic shenanigans? Students will explore the Monkey King and the novel through a number of lenses: religious, feminist, Marxist, literary, and historical.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas

How can we best understand sexuality and sexual desire? As humans, we are sexual creatures, yet sexual desire is often viewed by society as taboo and carefully regulated. This section examines potential reasons why, and subsequent repercussions. This is not a how-to course on human sexuality; rather, we will inquire into how we are (or are not) formally educated about sexual desire; how our beliefs about sex and sexuality are formed through religious traditions and cultural expectations; how we encounter representations of sex through visual and performing art, and media; and how industries and laws have formed to sell and regulate sexual content.

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas

How can we best understand sexuality and sexual desire? As humans, we are sexual creatures, yet sexual desire is often viewed by society as taboo and carefully regulated. This section examines potential reasons why, and subsequent repercussions. This is not a how-to course on human sexuality; rather, we will inquire into how we are (or are not) formally educated about sexual desire; how our beliefs about sex and sexuality are formed through religious traditions and cultural expectations; how we encounter representations of sex through visual and performing art, and media; and how industries and laws have formed to sell and regulate sexual content.

Link to this FAQ

Caroline Toy

How do people in the contemporary United States "imagine" religion? What is it supposed to be, and what is it supposed to do? This course examines how religion is constructed by, and how it influences, other fields of culture and public life, including media, activism, and space. Through three units, students will engage with pop culture portrayals of religion, legal and activist intersections with religion, and how religion is seen and heard (or unseen and unheard) in public. 

Link to this FAQ

Katheryn Wright

Is plant-based meat the future of food? In this section, we will interrogate the economics and politics of plant-based products and dig into the historical, cultural, and transcultural meanings of fake meat. Underpinning our investigation of fake meat will be an introduction to posthuman studies, which asks us to recalibrate what it means to be human by focusing on the connections between humans and technology, nonhuman species, and our collective lived environments.

What you discover will inevitably lead us to more philosophical questions, like: how does fake meat shift the relationship between humans, animals, technology, and our environment? Is plant-based meat fake, a simulation or copy, or is it asking us to redefine what counts as meat? How is the future of food—recognizing that food not only sustains but determines the very essence of life—connected to the idea of an emerging posthuman subjectivity?

You don't have to be a vegan or vegetarian to take this course nor will it be advocating for you to become one. Instead, we will dig into the intersection of food, science, technology, culture, identity, and power from multiple perspectives. Be prepared to never look at a burger in the same way again!

Link to this FAQ

Katheryn Wright

Is plant-based meat the future of food? In this section, we will interrogate the economics and politics of plant-based products and dig into the historical, cultural, and transcultural meanings of fake meat. Underpinning our investigation of fake meat will be an introduction to posthuman studies, which asks us to recalibrate what it means to be human by focusing on the connections between humans and technology, nonhuman species, and our collective lived environments.

What you discover will inevitably lead us to more philosophical questions, like: how does fake meat shift the relationship between humans, animals, technology, and our environment? Is plant-based meat fake, a simulation or copy, or is it asking us to redefine what counts as meat? How is the future of food—recognizing that food not only sustains but determines the very essence of life—connected to the idea of an emerging posthuman subjectivity?

You don't have to be a vegan or vegetarian to take this course nor will it be advocating for you to become one. Instead, we will dig into the intersection of food, science, technology, culture, identity, and power from multiple perspectives. Be prepared to never look at a burger in the same way again!

Link to this FAQ

SPRING SEMESTER

COR 203 | Core Foundations: Making Meaning through Culture

Culture impacts everything we do, experience, and learn, but what is culture? Where does it come from, how does it form, and why does it have such a wide and deep impact on people's lives? This course explores culture as a system of meaning and meaning-making in order to allow for a more thoughtful analysis of, and then engagement with, cultural texts and media using different methodological approaches.

COR 204 | Theoretical Perspectives on _____

In this course, you will go in depth about a theoretical perspective that asks you to interrogate systems of power and power relationships. You will learn about the history of that perspective, including how it too was shaped by multiple contexts and compares with other viewpoints. You will use that perspective to analyze a specific topic, collection of texts, or cultural phenomena.

You can explore the Spring 2022 Theoretical Perspectives topics below. Please note that current and previous topics are not guaranteed to be available in future semesters.

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Sanford Zale

What is Capitalism, and how does it shape economic activity, affect society, and influence political ideas and institutions? Should it be welcomed and promoted, tolerated and reformed, or resisted and refused, and why? In this section, we will address these questions by studying the classic works of four leading theorists in the Western tradition of political economy, reading and discussing sizeable excerpts from Adam Smith's Wealth of Nationsand Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto and Capital as well as shorter ones from Thorstein Veblen's The Theory of the Leisure Class and John Kenneth Galbraith's The Affluent Society. We will analyze their perspectives on Capitalism philosophically, examine them historically, and assess their contemporary validity by applying them to early 21st-century American economic, social, and political life. Ultimately, in addition to understanding and evaluating their responses to the questions posed above, we will also, in the light of them, formulate our own.

Link to this FAQ

Sanford Zale

What is Capitalism, and how does it shape economic activity, affect society, and influence political ideas and institutions? Should it be welcomed and promoted, tolerated and reformed, or resisted and refused, and why? In this section, we will address these questions by studying the classic works of four leading theorists in the Western tradition of political economy, reading and discussing sizeable excerpts from Adam Smith's Wealth of Nationsand Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto and Capital as well as shorter ones from Thorstein Veblen's The Theory of the Leisure Class and John Kenneth Galbraith's The Affluent Society. We will analyze their perspectives on Capitalism philosophically, examine them historically, and assess their contemporary validity by applying them to early 21st-century American economic, social, and political life. Ultimately, in addition to understanding and evaluating their responses to the questions posed above, we will also, in the light of them, formulate our own.

Link to this FAQ

Katheryn Wright

Are you into learning about cyborgs, animal-human hybrids, and biotechnology? All of these figures fall under the umbrella of the posthuman. Posthumanism is a theoretical framework that challenges the idea of human exceptionalism, or the belief that humans are at the center of the world. Instead, posthumanism focuses on the networked relations between humans, nonhumans, and technology with built and natural environments. In this section you will learn about posthumanism and apply it to a series of films from different time periods, genres, and places.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder

Theory, and using theory to help make sense of the world, is not a new concept. In the 14th century, Ibn Khaldun produced the Muqaddimah, described as the greatest work of history in the Arabic tradition but also the first true work of sociology. Ibn Khaldun was interested not simply in what happened in history, but also in how history "worked"—and also how a historian should approach their job of making sense of history, of getting at the truth. In this section, students will use the theories of Ibn Khaldun to make sense of the past and the present, by studying societal, cultural, and religious change.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder

Theory, and using theory to help make sense of the world, is not a new concept. In the 14th century, Ibn Khaldun produced the Muqaddimah, described as the greatest work of history in the Arabic tradition but also the first true work of sociology. Ibn Khaldun was interested not simply in what happened in history, but also in how history "worked"—and also how a historian should approach their job of making sense of history, of getting at the truth. In this section, students will use the theories of Ibn Khaldun to make sense of the past and the present, by studying societal, cultural, and religious change.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder

This section has a REQUIRED travel component, visiting the country of Jordan during Spring Break. See Professor Scudder for details about the itinerary, costs, covid-related planning, etc.

Theory, and using theory to help make sense of the world, is not a new concept. In the 14th century, Ibn Khaldun produced the Muqaddimah, described as the greatest work of history in the Arabic tradition but also the first true work of sociology. Ibn Khaldun was interested not simply in what happened in history, but also in how history "worked"—and also how a historian should approach their job of making sense of history, of getting at the truth. In this section, students will use the theories of Ibn Khaldun to make sense of the past and the present, by studying societal, cultural, and religious change.

Link to this FAQ

David Leo-Nyquist

In this section we'll explore how a variety of modern nations—including the US—have responded to national crises & collective trauma in their recent histories: how those nations remember—or choose to distort or forget—their past; and how they learn from their past—or not—as they face the future. We'll use a comparative historical framework for examining these issues.

Link to this FAQ

Mike Lange

People make meaning with food. One of the most powerful meanings that can be made with food is personal and cultural identity. How many people have a special dish that they bring to every family gathering? How often do we try a new version of something and think, "that's not what I grew up with"? Why do people argue endlessly about what constitutes "proper" pizza? Because food is a powerful vehicle for meaning and identity. In this section, you will explore two foods (and the processes for acquiring them) that are strongly connected to the culture and identity of Vermont: maple syrup and venison. Whether you grew up here or first stepped foot in the state recently, this section will give you tools and perspectives about the state that surrounds you now.

Link to this FAQ

Mike Lange

People make meaning with food. One of the most powerful meanings that can be made with food is personal and cultural identity. How many people have a special dish that they bring to every family gathering? How often do we try a new version of something and think, "that's not what I grew up with"? Why do people argue endlessly about what constitutes "proper" pizza? Because food is a powerful vehicle for meaning and identity. In this section, you will explore two foods (and the processes for acquiring them) that are strongly connected to the culture and identity of Vermont: maple syrup and venison. Whether you grew up here or first stepped foot in the state recently, this section will give you tools and perspectives about the state that surrounds you now.

Link to this FAQ

Miriam Horne

From its origins to its ingredients, from production to consumption, every aspect of how we eat is rhetorical. Rhetorical genre theory, or the study of language and how we use language to communicate to a particular audience at a particular time in a particular place in a particular way, provides a lens to understand how recipes connect us to our past, our culture, our socio-economic conditions, and even to political landscapes. We will engage in the study of rhetoric to understand not just a list of ingredients and instructions. Rather, from ancient beer recipes to the recipes scribbled on great-grandma's note cards and family hand-me-downs, to online recipes, we will use rhetoric to examine the structures, voice, and information to persuade the recipe's audience of the best way to prepare a dish. Each recipe has a story to tell-the story of who wields the power to feed, and who has the power to eat.

Link to this FAQ

Miriam Horne

From its origins to its ingredients, from production to consumption, every aspect of how we eat is rhetorical. Rhetorical genre theory, or the study of language and how we use language to communicate to a particular audience at a particular time in a particular place in a particular way, provides a lens to understand how recipes connect us to our past, our culture, our socio-economic conditions, and even to political landscapes. We will engage in the study of rhetoric to understand not just a list of ingredients and instructions. Rather, from ancient beer recipes to the recipes scribbled on great-grandma's note cards and family hand-me-downs, to online recipes, we will use rhetoric to examine the structures, voice, and information to persuade the recipe's audience of the best way to prepare a dish. Each recipe has a story to tell-the story of who wields the power to feed, and who has the power to eat.

Link to this FAQ

Weiling Deng

This section explores gender in Asia against the background of Asia's modernization circa the late 1800s. Its theoretical perspectives draw on Third World feminist politics and the history of colonization and decolonizing movements. Rather than seeing "gender" as a universal, transhistorical concept of human rights, this course emphasizes its materiality. With a special focus on China, the discussion of "gender" will examine the import of photographic technology that contradicted the culture of concealment, anatomical science that polarized femininity and masculinity, the urban press and filmmaking that indigenized Hollywood aesthetics, electronic transistors that integrated gendered sounds with nationalism, and so on. These material contexts will provide students a critical understanding of "gender" vis-à-vis colonialism grounded in everyday life.

Link to this FAQ

Weiling Deng

This section explores gender in Asia against the background of Asia's modernization circa the late 1800s. Its theoretical perspectives draw on Third World feminist politics and the history of colonization and decolonizing movements. Rather than seeing "gender" as a universal, transhistorical concept of human rights, this course emphasizes its materiality. With a special focus on China, the discussion of "gender" will examine the import of photographic technology that contradicted the culture of concealment, anatomical science that polarized femininity and masculinity, the urban press and filmmaking that indigenized Hollywood aesthetics, electronic transistors that integrated gendered sounds with nationalism, and so on. These material contexts will provide students a critical understanding of "gender" vis-à-vis colonialism grounded in everyday life.

Link to this FAQ

Jonathan Banfill

Borders exist all around us. Whether they are physical, conceptual, or psychological; visible or invisible; disciplinary or professional; borders create division, separating nations, spaces, and peoples. This has never been more apparent than in recent years where political fractures and other global events have combined to create a world that is seemingly more disconnected than before, both transnationally and interpersonally. Drawing from political theory, anthropology, Chicanx studies, critical architecture and urban spatial practice, and art, among other disciplines, this section investigates a wide range of theoretical perspectives on borders, examining how they manifest in the world around us. At the same time, this section seeks out sites of commons and collectively in our local world, i.e., those spaces where borders have the potential to be collapsed, as a means of applying theoretical concepts and participating in active worldbuilding.

Link to this FAQ

Jonathan Banfill

Borders exist all around us. Whether they are physical, conceptual, or psychological; visible or invisible; disciplinary or professional; borders create division, separating nations, spaces, and peoples. This has never been more apparent than in recent years where political fractures and other global events have combined to create a world that is seemingly more disconnected than before, both transnationally and interpersonally. Drawing from political theory, anthropology, Chicanx studies, critical architecture and urban spatial practice, and art, among other disciplines, this section investigates a wide range of theoretical perspectives on borders, examining how they manifest in the world around us. At the same time, this section seeks out sites of commons and collectively in our local world, i.e., those spaces where borders have the potential to be collapsed, as a means of applying theoretical concepts and participating in active worldbuilding.

Link to this FAQ

Liz Allen-Pennebaker

For many decades after the end of the Nazi regime, Austria tried to disavow its share of responsibility for one of the worst genocides in history. In reality, however, many of the seeds of Nazi racial ideology were sown not in Germany, but in Adolf Hitler's own Austria. Over the centuries, the ideological currents that shaped Nazism have also manifested in phenomena as varied as the public response to the 1683 Ottoman siege of Vienna, official measures taken to control the bubonic plague, Hungarian vampire folklore, the seminal S&M novel Venus in Furs, the diagnosis and treatment of autism, Cold War anti-Communist propaganda, and the ways in which Austrian mosques are funded today. In this section we'll use the theoretical lenses of Marxism, Orientalism, and Nationalism to examine the past and present of this ideology and its sometimes-surprising connections to the United States—and even to Burlington, VT.

Link to this FAQ

Liz Allen-Pennebaker

For many decades after the end of the Nazi regime, Austria tried to disavow its share of responsibility for one of the worst genocides in history. In reality, however, many of the seeds of Nazi racial ideology were sown not in Germany, but in Adolf Hitler's own Austria. Over the centuries, the ideological currents that shaped Nazism have also manifested in phenomena as varied as the public response to the 1683 Ottoman siege of Vienna, official measures taken to control the bubonic plague, Hungarian vampire folklore, the seminal S&M novel Venus in Furs, the diagnosis and treatment of autism, Cold War anti-Communist propaganda, and the ways in which Austrian mosques are funded today. In this section we'll use the theoretical lenses of Marxism, Orientalism, and Nationalism to examine the past and present of this ideology and its sometimes-surprising connections to the United States—and even to Burlington, VT.

Link to this FAQ

Liz Allen-Pennebaker

For many decades after the end of the Nazi regime, Austria tried to disavow its share of responsibility for one of the worst genocides in history. In reality, however, many of the seeds of Nazi racial ideology were sown not in Germany, but in Adolf Hitler's own Austria. Over the centuries, the ideological currents that shaped Nazism have also manifested in phenomena as varied as the public response to the 1683 Ottoman siege of Vienna, official measures taken to control the bubonic plague, Hungarian vampire folklore, the seminal S&M novel Venus in Furs, the diagnosis and treatment of autism, Cold War anti-Communist propaganda, and the ways in which Austrian mosques are funded today. In this section we'll use the theoretical lenses of Marxism, Orientalism, and Nationalism to examine the past and present of this ideology and its sometimes-surprising connections to the United States—and even to Burlington, VT.

Link to this FAQ