Second Year Experience

In your second year at Champlain, you'll choose from a wide variety of Core classes. These classes each develop and expand on the skills you practiced in your first year, while introducing new concepts.

You'll choose two different Core courses in the fall semester and another two Core courses in the spring semester—you can browse the course sections below and read more by clicking on each section title.

FALL SEMESTER

COR 210 | Scientific Revolutions

Original course:
The challenges of the 21st century demand an understanding of the nature and limitations of scientific thinking, the place of science within society, and its relationship to other forms of human thought and expression such as religion, art, and literature. This course will examine three major transformations of scientific ideas and their social and historical context, and will help students gain a broad understanding of the relationship of scientific ideas to other forms of thought and expression.

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Chuck Bashaw
Section 01 | Section 02

This section will focus partly on ideas and phenomena on the "fringe" of science, including UFOs, magic and the occult, and the paranormal and the supernatural. This section is part of a year-long cohort with Prof. Steve Wehmeyer's X-Files-themed section of COR-250 (The Secular & the Sacred), which will be offered in Spring 2021.

Students who enroll in this section of COR-210 commit to also enrolling in Prof. Wehmeyer's section of 250 in the spring. For this reason, registration in this section is only by permission of the instructor. Please contact Prof. Bashaw directly for permission to register for this class.

Link to this FAQ

David Leo-Nyquist
Section 03

This section focuses on the ongoing struggle in Europe and the U.S. between religious belief and unbelief and the emergence of a secular worldview.

Link to this FAQ

Robert Mayer
Section 04

Mike Lange
Section 05 | Section 06

Please see original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Kristin Wolf
Section 07 | Section 08

In this section, students will explore the concept of scientific literacy and its role in being a responsible citizen. Investigating the science of vaccines, GMOs, climate change, and other popular topics, students will see how science is communicated, applied, and in some cases, misunderstood by the time it reaches the general public.

Link to this FAQ

COR 220 | Aesthetic Expressions

Original course:
What is art? How do literature and music express both traditional and revolutionary ideas? This course will explore the nature of artistic, musical, and literary expression in the Western tradition. Students will analyze and discuss major artistic, musical, and literary accomplishments of Western culture and explore how the arts function as expressions of cultural ideals and as forces of challenge and transformation.

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Jen Berger
Section 01

This section will cover the politics of public art. Who is public space for? How does it matter how we use it?

Link to this FAQ

Joanne Farrell
Section 02

This section of Aesthetic Expressions will explore the nature of theatre in Western culture as a literary, visual, and performing art form. Studying the various arts that go into the making of theatre as entertainment, an instrument for education, a weapon for social and political change, or a documentary of history will allow us to examine how theatre functions as an expression of cultural ideals and as forces of challenge and transformation.

Link to this FAQ

Jeff Haig
Section 03 | Section 04

Cynthia Morgan
Section 05

Please see original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Rowshan Nemazee
Section 06SIS | Section 07SL

This section will focus exclusively on art, identity, and difference. We will probe questions related to beauty and diversity, and explore the aesthetics of the diasporic or marginalized. Our approach will be both interdisciplinary (through the use of diverse critical methodologies) and integrative (by considering the relationships between various markers of identity: race, gender, religion, socio-political constructs, and class).

Link to this FAQ

Melissa Proietti
Section 08 | Section 09

We will be analyzing these two forms of public in art in ways that seek to understand how social circumstances affect the ways that they are produced, the locations in which they appear, and audiences to which they appeal.

Link to this FAQ

Gary Scudder
Section 10 | Section 11 | Section 12

Artists have routinely found inspiration for their art in the pursuit of beauty, both physical and spiritual. Students in this class will explore different global understandings of beauty in paintings, sculpture, architecture, and music. In addition to focusing on Renaissance and Modern Art, students will explore the different aesthetic criteria of the African, Indian, Arabic, and East Asian worlds to provide broader context.

Link to this FAQ

Sandy Zale
Section 13 | Section 14 | Section 15

This section, which examines the arts in Western Europe in the medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Romantic periods, focuses on the arts of the past rather than those of the present. It stresses visual art and literary art, and it pays more attention to literature and less attention to music.

Link to this FAQ

COR 230 | Ethics & Environment

Original course:
The decisions humans make about the environment today will decide the fate of future generations. Understanding the relationship between humans and the environment, along with the ethical frameworks used to interact with and make decisions about the environment, is of paramount importance. This course will investigate the origins and evolution of environmental ethics, as well as the contributions of scientific research and aesthetic expression, to trace human perceptions of the environment throughout history and address today's environmental issues.

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Ed Cafferty
Section 01

Melissa Proietti
Section 02

Please see the original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Kristin Wolf
Section 03SIS | Section 04

In this section of COR 230, you will explore water-related topics including aquatic habitats, pollution, scarcity, and the ethics of owning, protecting, and distributing water. From local questions, like: Is Vermont effectively protecting its water resources? To global questions, such as: How will new climate realities reshape our world? This class will provide a framework for approaching water in an informed and ethical way.

Link to this FAQ

Jeanne Lieberman
Section 05

For this course, we will research and debate the ethical stances underlying our relationship to the land. We will consider the concrete ramifications of our abstract positions. Examples of concrete issues are: drought, hunger, invasive species of flora and fauna, GMOs, global corporate thuggery (Monsanto, Nestle, et al), national security, conspiracy theories, innovations, and how the logical, life-affirming techniques of permaculture can feed our bellies, exercise our imaginations, and nurture our spirits.

Link to this FAQ

Ariel Burgess
Section 51 | Section 52

Our human relationship to the earth has moved through many iterations. At times, human cultures aimed to dominate and control nature, and at others, humans thought of themselves as Earth's protectors. Throughout history, artists and their work have been intimately woven into the culture in which they live. Artists respond to their society, and help it evolve by articulating new ways of thinking, looking, responding, and being. Art can inspire action, celebrate beauty, break your heart, and help heal.

In this section, we will explore a breadth of environmental ethics and how artists have interacted with them. Through examples as old as creation myths to our contemporary attitude toward climate change, we will look at how a culture's ethics toward the environment today will shape the world we live in tomorrow. By looking at how artists deal with questions of our human relationship to the natural world, we will explore how the power of art can be used to develop environmental ethics that are healthy, holistic, sustainable, and just.

Link to this FAQ

COR 240 | Bodies

Original course:
From Neolithic fertility goddesses to contemporary piercings and tattoos, human cultures are inextricably entangled with ideas about the body. Perceptions and experiences of the body influence ethical debates about media representation, healthcare, and biotechnology. This course explores embodiment in the Western tradition: How do we know ourselves through our physical bodies? How are different types of bodies represented in our arts and media? And how does the body influence the way we think about the world?

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Jen Berger
Section 01 | Section 02

In this section of 'Bodies,' we will explore the idea of representation. What does it mean to see our body (identity, size, shape, color, ability, etc.) represented by the dominant culture? What does it mean when it isn't? We will look at representation in television, movies, media, art, advertising, and more. 

Link to this FAQ

Angela Glover Howell
Section 03 | Section 04

Please see original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Erik Shonstrom
Section 05 | Section 06

Human bodies evolved in adaptive response to the environment. The implications of this development include our morphology, but also how we communicate and think. This section explores "embodiment" through the role our bodies play in cognition, behavior, empathy, and even social interactions. Whether climbing trees or sitting on office chairs, the way our bodies interact with the world around us—and each other—can illustrate our evolutionary history. In this section, we'll be dancing, walking, and moving our way toward a clearer picture of the way sensorimotor interaction with the environment informs every single aspect of our lives.

Link to this FAQ

Kristin Novotny
Section 07 | Section 08

In this section of Bodies, we will focus on the concept of "body image" and its social, political, and personal implications. We will weave together sociological and historical research with lived experience, media analysis, and interview methodology, resulting in a collaborative class blog or printed publication. 

Link to this FAQ

Kelly Thomas
Section 09SIS | Section 10

How we perceive and experience the body influences debate about its representation in media, healthcare, and technology—often affecting local, state, and national politics and subsequent legislation. This section examines the impact of socioeconomic realities on the body, and focuses on the embodied experience of "poor white trash," refugees and "illegals," the mass-incarcerated, and the addicted.

Link to this FAQ

Katheryn Wright
Section 11 | Section 12

Are you into learning about cyborgs, animal-human hybrids, and biotechnology? All of these figurations fall under the umbrella of posthumanism. This section will focus on the significance of posthuman bodies in popular culture. Be prepared to read a lot of philosophy, watch a healthy dose of movies and television, and maybe even play a video game or two for homework!

Link to this FAQ

SPRING SEMESTER

COR 240 | Colonialism & Western Identity

Original course:
The West: What is it? Is it a place, a set of ideas and traditions, a period of history, an economic or political system? This course will examine how the West must be understood through encounters with the rest of the world, and through interactions between West and non-West. Colonialism initially determined the nature of those interactions, and the legacies of colonialism continue to shape Western identity today.

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Faculty
Section: N/A

Please see the original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty 
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

2019 marked the 400-year anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to what is now the United States. In the spirit of recognizing this foundational component of United States history, this section does a deep, interdisciplinary dive into the economic, ideological, social, and cultural motivations informing the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, as well as the continuing effects of it.

We will work to connect the dots between the interconnected histories and racialized class systems of the United States and the Caribbean as a result of The Middle Passage. We will draw upon excerpts of the diasporic life writings of abolitionists Olaudah Equiano and Mary Prince, in addition to contemporary Afrofuturist/surrealist cultural knowledge production, including John Jennings' graphic novel of Octavia Butler's Kindred, Julie Dash's 1991 film Daughters of the Dust, Beyoncé's 2016 album Lemonade, and Ryan Coogler's 2018 film Black Panther.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty 
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

From Jamestown to the Muslim ban, the United States of America has always struggled with questions of who belongs and why. The concept of "the West," and America's place within that construct, is often at the heart of those questions. Understanding social identities—ethnic, national, regional, and racial (among others)—provides useful insights into debates about immigration in the United States, and is a vital tool for moving beyond the simplistic faultlines of contemporary politics.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

Changing the names of buildings, removing statues, teach-ins, "street academies," creating and posting public syllabi, student protests, university reparations projects, and inviting scholars "from the margins" in conversation with popularized "Western" texts are some of the global practices that challenge the idea of the "colonial" university.

This section will leverage the fact that higher education institutions such as Champlain College serve as ideal laboratories to study how colleges and universities reproduce and resist colonialism within and beyond their global communities.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

What can colonialism tell us about whiteness and racism? In this class, we will examine the relationship between Western identity and white racial superiority complexes. We will engage with critical theories, cultural narratives, and popular media that challenge and reinforce Western values, beliefs, and ideals. To that end, we will analyze modern society within the context of white-centrism. Lastly, we will also look at the role that decolonization has played in understanding recolonization and liberation.

Link to this FAQ

COR 270 | Heroines & Heroes

Original course:
Western culture has long reserved a special word for the greatest human achievements: heroic. Heroic tales range from ancient epics to today's movies, sports broadcasts, political campaigns, etc. What do heroic stories tell us about who we are, have been, and aspire to be? Does "heroic" describe our ultimate potential, or has it lost meaning? This course examines heroines/heroes in wide-ranging works, adopting varied critical approaches to examining their profound influence on how we understand ourselves and our world.

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Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

From the fleet-footed runners and champion boxers of Ancient Greece to the star quarterbacks and golden gloves of today's sports-entertainment complex, athletes have captured society's fascination with the seemingly superhuman. This course explores how media and public discourse have constructed the athlete as hero over time, and includes examinations of gender and race as critical aspects of these constructions.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty 
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

"May the force be with you" as we use a variety of critical lenses to explore Luke Skywalker's transformational journey. Our focus on George Lucas's original trilogy will drive you to identify pieces of your own heroic quest and think about key elements of storytelling.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty 
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section uses several different stories by Hans Christian Andersen (author of what you think of as fairy tales, like "The Little Mermaid" and "The Little Match Girl"—stories that you might think are happy, but are really, really not) to explore existential questions of love, death, sex, the afterlife, what it means to be human, and what it means to be heroic. Finishing with an in-depth exploration of Andersen's dark, mystical, and philosophical story, "The Shadow," this class analyzes fundamental questions of human identity.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section will focus on Nobel Prize recipients as our heroines and heroes. We'll begin with Alfred Nobel himself—a scientist, inventor, businessman, poet, and playwright, who left the majority of his wealth toward the establishment of a foundation to honor individuals "who, during the preceding year, have conferred the greatest benefit to humankind.”

For over a century, the Nobel Foundation has been recognizing remarkable people and organizations from our global community for "outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and for work in peace." Our approach will be both interdisciplinary (through the use of diverse critical methodologies) and integrative (by considering the relationships between various markers of identity: race, gender, religion, socio-political constructs, and class).

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please see the original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section focuses on Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (and other works by J. K. Rowling, as well as the phenomenon of Potter tourism and fan culture), as we examine heroines and heroes in magical tales. We will use various critical approaches in our consideration of the novel and of the profound influence of Harry Potter on how we understand ourselves and our world.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

Much of the last century of popular culture, especially American popular culture, has been dominated by the anti-hero, that protagonist who—on their best days—is deeply flawed, and who might actually only be the hero because there aren't any better options. As our taste in anti-heroes grows darker and more troubled, will we end celebrating the villains? Students in this section will struggle with that question, and also study one of literature's great dark characters: Raskolnikov from Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

Within the massive compendium of heroic myth and literature, there's a vibrant subgenre: heroic tales featuring children. Kids are a different kind of hero, whether it's the plucky Chihiro of Miyazaki's Spirited Away or Piggy from Lord of the Flies.

Adult heroes often are fighting to reinforce the dominant paradigm: Beowulf is out to etch his name into history. But children are different—they fight for different reasons. Wolverine and Batman are grumpy old men kvetching about saving the universe. Peter Pan is just out to cause effervescent anarchy, and this class explores why stories about kids shatter traditional expectations of heroism.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section of Heroines and Heroes is all about the F-word... a.k.a. feminism. We will dig into key debates in feminist media studies, examining heroic figures in popular culture (movies, television, graphic novels, in the news, etc.) along the way.

Link to this FAQ

COR 260 | Democracies

Original course:
The 20th century saw the international triumph of the twin pillars of modern Western life: capitalism and democracy. The 21st-century problems of globalism, environmental degradation, and terrorism, however, pose unique challenges to these institutions. This course will study the origins and development of our primary ideals of social organization. Students will actively engage questions about the value and future of capitalism and democracy while learning about its past.

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Faculty
Section: N/A

Please see the original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

In this section, we will explore the benefits and burdens of individual freedom and liberty. Are free citizens the foundation of capitalism and democracy, or are they a threat to these institutions?

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

From ancient Greece to the 21st century White House, we will examine the role played by those who "spoke truth to power" in the formation, maintenance, and viability of democracies and democracy movements. Through the lenses of history, media, and literature, we will explore context, consequences, methods, and achievements and consider future applications.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section will explore the following questions: What exactly is "democracy;" how has it evolved over time; and are we—at home and abroad—still committed to its basic principles? What are the most serious threats to democracy in the Age of Trump? Where do we look today to see examples of flourishing democracy?

Link to this FAQ

COR 250 | The Secular & the Sacred

Original course:
What roles do religion and spirituality play in society? By applying theoretical frameworks used to study religion as a cultural phenomenon, examining the development and influence of religious and spiritual traditions in the West, and exploring diverse religious and spiritual identities in contemporary Western society, students will investigate the ways religion and spirituality have shaped personal, political, social, and cultural institutions and practices in the West.

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Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

India is often described as the most spiritual country in the world, as well as the most religiously diverse, but it is also a nation that clearly defines itself as secular. Students in Sacred & Secular routinely explore the complex interaction between the sacred and secular worlds, but it is difficult to imagine a country with more potential for rich study than that provided by India.

This section features a required spring break trip to India. Instructor permission is required for registration.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

Where does fringe science meet fringe religion? Why do UFO abduction narratives matter? Why are modern biologists obsessed with "The God Gene?" Why was Thomas Edison trying to build a machine to speak with the dead? Where do science, religion, technology, and "magic" meet, and where do they diverge?

This section of COR 250—facilitated by professors Chuck Bashaw and Steve Wehmeyer—is part of an intensive, year-long collaborative exploration of the marginal ways of knowing that characterize and sometimes define the Western Intellectual Tradition. The truth is out there!

(Only students who are currently enrolled in Bashaw’s section of COR-210 in FA19 are able to enroll in this section of COR-250.)

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section will expose and explore the contributions that various feminist and gender studies have made both to western religions and to the study and practice of religious rites and rituals in the 21st century. It will further delve into the ideological and theological "stained glass ceilings" and practical hurdles to equality that women and LGBTQ communities have had to face in institutional forms of religion. These gendered lenses will offer new recognition of and regard for the intersection of the sacred and the secular.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

This section will explore the contributions that sacred architecture has made toward our understandings of religious/theological concepts, the idea of the "sacred," and an awareness of "spirituality" from secular perspectives. It will further analyze the parallels and differences between the sacred architectures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam together with an assessment of modern architecture's approach to non-denominational "spiritual" spaces through nature, form, light, scale, and materiality or lack thereof.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

Please see the original course description above.

Link to this FAQ

Faculty
Section: N/A

Please note that this course description is a sample for reference only—this particular course may not be offered in an upcoming semester.

In this section, we will interrogate the terms “religion” and “race” as categories that mark social difference, shape debates about social justice and equity, are often used to justify exclusionary policies, and fuel hate crimes within and outside of the U.S. We will examine how the categories of religion and race shift and change at different moments in U.S. history, shaping conversations about education and immigration policies, cultural practices of social reform and protest, and U.S. missionary and humanitarian interventions.

Link to this FAQ